Introduction

NODA Intelligent Systems (NODA) is a spin-off company from research within artificial intelligence at Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden. NODA was founded in 2005 and currently has offices in Karlshamn and Malmö in Sweden.

NODA has customers and partners throughout Europe, North America and Asia. The focus of NODA is to develop and market AI-based solutions for thermal systems like district heating and cooling, heat pumps and gas.

In addition, NODA has a strong relationship with universities and research institutes in research and innovation. NODA works with several partners and customers to implement its technology and market approach. These partners range from large global companies to local and regional energy companies or building owners.

Traditionally, the focus of NODA has primarily been on district heating. Still, the last few years have seen an increased focus on hybrid systems based on thermal processes such as combined heat and power, heat pumps and excess heat extraction. This gives NODA a broad range of working knowledge of different types of systems and how they can be combined.

NODA works in the production and delivery chain regarding product development from core research to operational products and routinely participates in international and national research and innovation projects.

Products and services

NODA works with a wide variety of partners and we implement hardware or software integrations wherever needed. In addition, by avoiding tying oneself to a particular equipment manufacturer and relying on in-house software development, NODA is flexible enough to change when new requirements call for change.

EnergyView

EnergyView

This tool has evolved over the years. Its inception was back in 2009 under the working name Linckii. EnergyView is the primary tool for interacting with data stored from communication with field equipment and the output from our machine learning algorithms.

We deploy each customer domain on a separate database. Thus, creating partitions between customers to prevent accidental, unauthorized access.

EnergyView allows access to the time-series data through configurable time-series graphs. Users with more than basic access privileges can change most aspects of an installation.

The system also exposes essential objects as a REST API over HTTP. This interface allows for third-party interaction with the system.

My Pages

My Pages

My Pages is a much simpler tool compared to EnergyView. Its demographic is customers who want a direct answer, not a philosophical discussion surrounding the question.

Here customers can see all control actions the NODA equipment has performed. They can also get an energy analysis of their heating system and energy consumption along with time-series graphs of their indoor sensors.

Self-host

My Pages

The purpose of the NODA Self-host is to provide customers with an option to run the core components of the NODA system in their environment as their responsibility. This includes;

  • API Server (Aapije)
  • Program Server (Juvuln and Malgomaj)
  • DBMS (PostgreSQL 12.0+)

These components are all Open Source and freely available for anyone to use without paying for the software. However, a negotiated support agreement is required for aid in deployment.

In a project, we expect customer-specific integrations and the addition of NODAs proprietary software.

Components such as;

  • Machine Learning Algorithms (Kimaera)
  • MQTT protocol translation bridges
  • User interfaces

Document Notes

All information in this manual, including product data, diagrams, charts, etcetera. represents information on products at the time of publication, and is subject to change without prior notice due to product improvements or other reasons.

The documentation and product are provided on an "as is" basis only and may contain deficiencies or inadequacies. NODA Intelligent Systems AB takes no responsibility for damages, liabilities or other losses by using this product.

© 2022, NODA Intelligent Systems AB.

All rights reserved. No part of the contents of this manual may be transmitted or reproduced in any form by any means without the written permission of NODA Intelligent Systems AB.

Contact information

NODA Intelligent Systems AB Headquarter

Biblioteksgatan 4
374 35 Karlshamn
SWEDEN

NODA Intelligent Systems AB Technical Support

NODA Glossary

This is a glossary of terms used in the NODA documentation.

District heating terminology

TermDefinition
CHPCombined heat and power, also known as cogeneration, is a system that generates both electricity and heat from a single fuel source, such as natural gas, biomass, or biogas. CHP systems can be more efficient and environmentally friendly than traditional power generation and heating systems.
District heatingA system that delivers heat from a central source, such as a CHP plant or a heating plant, to multiple buildings or homes through a network of underground pipes. District heating systems can be more efficient and environmentally friendly than individual heating systems in each building.
Heat exchangerA device that transfers heat from one fluid or medium to another, without the two fluids or media coming into direct contact. Heat exchangers are commonly used in district heating systems to transfer heat from the hot water in the pipes to the water in the building's heating system.
Heat meterA device that measures the amount of heat delivered to a building or home through a district heating system. Heat meters are typically used to bill customers for the heat they consume based on their usage.
Heat networkAnother term for a district heating system, referring to the network of pipes that delivers heat from a central source to multiple buildings or homes.
Pipe insulationInsulation that is used to wrap the pipes in a district heating system to reduce heat loss and improve efficiency.
Primary loopThe portion of a district heating system that carries hot water from the central source, such as a CHP plant or a heating plant, to the substations.
Secondary loopThe portion of a district heating system that carries hot water from the substations to the buildings or homes.
SubstationA device that is used to control and distribute the heat delivered by a district heating system to multiple buildings or homes. A substation typically includes a heat exchanger, a pump, and other equipment to regulate the flow of heat and maintain the desired temperature in the heating system.
Temperature control valveA valve that is used to regulate the flow of hot water in a district heating system and maintain the desired temperature in the heating system.
Thermal storageThe use of heat storage tanks or other devices to store excess heat generated by a district heating system for later use. Thermal storage can help to smooth out fluctuations in

IT-infrastructure

TermDefinition
BackupThe process of creating copies of data or other resources in case the original is lost, damaged, or otherwise becomes unavailable. Backups are typically stored on separate devices or media, such as external hard drives or cloud storage, to ensure that they are not lost along with the original.
Cloud computingA model of computing in which users access and use shared resources, such as computing power, storage, and software, over the internet, rather than using their own local resources. Cloud computing can be more cost-effective and scalable than traditional computing models.
Data centerA facility that houses and supports the operation of servers, storage systems, and other IT infrastructure. Data centers may be owned and operated by a company, or they may be provided by a third party as a service.
Domain nameA unique name that is used to identify a website or other internet resource. Domain names are typically organized into a hierarchy based on the type of resource, such as .com for commercial websites, .gov for US government websites, and .edu for educational websites.
FirewallA security system that monitors and controls incoming and outgoing network traffic based on predetermined security rules. Firewalls are used to protect networks from unauthorized access, malware, and other threats.
InfrastructureThe underlying framework or structures that support the operation of a system or service. In the context of IT, infrastructure typically refers to the hardware, software, and other resources that are needed to support the operation of a network or other IT system.
Load balancerA device or software that distributes incoming network traffic across multiple servers or resources to improve the performance and availability of a network or service. Load balancers can use various algorithms to determine how to route traffic, such as round-robin or least connections.
Managed serviceA service provided by a third party that is responsible for the management and maintenance of a particular aspect of an organization's IT infrastructure, such as security, storage, or networking. Managed services can help organizations to more effectively manage their IT resources and reduce costs.
Network segmentA portion of a network that is separated from other parts of the network by a device, such as a switch or router. Network segments can be used to improve the performance and security of a network by isolating traffic and limiting access to certain resources.
ProtocolA set of rules or conventions that govern the communication between devices or systems. Protocols define how devices should connect, transmit data, and handle errors. There are many different protocols used in networking and other fields, such as HTTP, SMTP, and FTP.
RouterA device that connects multiple networks and forwards data packets between them based on their destination. Routers use routing tables and protocols to determine the most efficient path for data to travel and can also provide security and other networking services.
Security groupA collection of rules that define the traffic that is allowed to flow in and out of a network or resource. Security groups can be used to control access to resources and protect them from unauthorized access or attacks.
Virtual machineA software-based simulation of a physical computer that runs on top of a host operating system. Virtual machines allow multiple operating systems or applications to run on a single physical server, providing benefits such as improved resource utilization and easier management.
Virtual networkA network that is created and managed entirely within software, rather than using physical networking hardware. Virtual networks can be used to create isolated networking environments within a larger network, or to connect multiple networks together.
Virtual private network (VPN)A private network that is created over a public network, such as the internet. VPNs use encryption and other security measures to protect data transmitted over the network and to provide secure remote access to resources.
VLANA virtual local area network (VLAN) is a logical grouping of devices that are created within a larger network. VLANs are used to segment a network into smaller, more secure and efficient sub-networks.
WANA wide area network (WAN) is a network that spans a large geographical area, such as a country or the entire globe. WANs are typically used to connect multiple smaller networks, such as LANs or WLANs, together and can be implemented using various technologies, such as leased lines or satellite links.
Web serverA server that is designed to host websites and provide web content and services over the internet. Web servers typically run software, such as Apache or Microsoft IIS, that is responsible for handling requests from clients and serving content in response.
WLANA wireless local area network (WLAN) is a network that connects devices using wireless technology, such as Wi-Fi. WLANs can be used to provide connectivity within a limited area, such as a home or office, or can be connected to a larger network, such as the internet.

Modbus terminology

TermDefinition
AddressThe location of a register or other data element on a Modbus server. Modbus addresses are typically expressed as 16-bit values, ranging from 0 to 65,535.
ClientA device that initiates communication with a Modbus server by sending requests for data or commands. Also known as a master.
CommandAn instruction or request sent by a Modbus client to a Modbus server. Modbus commands are typically expressed as function codes, which specify the type of operation being requested.
Function codeA code that specifies the type of operation being requested in a Modbus command. Modbus function codes range from 0 to 255 and include codes for reading and writing data, diagnostics, and other operations.
Latching registerA register that retains its value until it is explicitly overwritten or reset. The specific behavior of latching registers may vary depending on the manufacturer.
MasterSee "client"
ModbusA communication protocol that is used to exchange data between devices over a variety of communication links, including serial and Ethernet. Modbus is widely used in industrial and building automation systems to enable devices to communicate with each other and exchange data.
Non-latching registerA register that does not retain its value after power is removed. The specific behavior of non-latching registers may vary depending on the manufacturer.
RegisterA location in the memory of a Modbus server that is used to store or retrieve data. Modbus registers are typically 16 bits in size and are addressed using 16-bit values.
ServerA device that responds to requests for data or commands from a Modbus client. Also known as a slave.
SlaveSee "server"
WordA 16-bit value. Modbus registers are typically addressed and accessed as words, rather than individual bytes.

Introduction

Introduction

API

Program Manager

Introduction

Introduction

Introduction

Introduction

API

Infrastructure introduction

The infrastructure required to run the NODA system is reasonably complex. It is no surprise that a complex system carries an inherently higher risk of exposure to attacks.

At the forefront of every design decision, NODA strives to mitigate the risk of such attacks.

Reliable, secure and encrypted communication channels are vital to achieving a secure environment.

But it's not the only item of importance.

Who has access, when they have access and why they have access are just as essential to prevent intrusion.

Devices in the field must never expose any ports to the internet. Instead, NODA solves the two-way communication by establishing a secure communication channel over MQTT to a managed service where each device has its own access rules.

Suppose the private certificate on a device, for whatever reason, is highjacked. Then, the device can easily be black-listed, and the certificate revoked to prevent further access.

Infrastructure introduction

The infrastructure required to run the NODA system is reasonably complex. It is no surprise that a complex system carries an inherently higher risk of exposure to attacks.

At the forefront of every design decision, NODA strives to mitigate the risk of such attacks.

Reliable, secure and encrypted communication channels are vital to achieving a secure environment.

But it's not the only item of importance.

Who has access, when they have access and why they have access are just as essential to prevent intrusion.

Devices in the field must never expose any ports to the internet. Instead, NODA solves the two-way communication by establishing a secure communication channel over MQTT to a managed service where each device has its own access rules.

Suppose the private certificate on a device, for whatever reason, is highjacked. Then, the device can easily be black-listed, and the certificate revoked to prevent further access.

Design in broad brush strokes

NODA aims to control energy equipment situated in the field. These devices are often located in the basement of buildings or inside smaller sheds in the vicinity.

By gathering vital data from these devices and crunching the numbers with machine learning algorithms, NODA achieves energy savings on a building level and also solves far more complex city-wide problems.

NODA provides equipment at the customer's site to communicate with many existing energy controllers. Often without the need to replace any existing hardware.

ArchitectureCommon installationclusterSiteACustomer SiteclusterAWSIoTNODANODA EquipmentNODA EquipmentEnergy ControllerEnergy ControllerNODA Equipment->Energy ControllerInternet☁️ InternetNODA Equipment->Internet🔒ServerServerComputationsComputationsServer->ComputationsDatabaseDatabaseServer->DatabaseComputations->DatabaseUIUIUI->DatabasePerson🧑Person->UIInternet->Server🔒

On the server-side, NODA manages all of the ingress data, performs computations and solves optimization problems using both multi agent systems and machine learning.

Finally, the resulting control action signal is sent back to the controller over the internet.

Most of the data from these computations are then organized and presented so that it's practical and helps the customer in their daily work.

Security of the infrastructure

ArchitectureBetter safe than sorry.Vest🔒 🦺 🔑

Accounts

  • Never give personnel more access than strictly necessary to do their work.
  • Whenever possible, use automatic termination of accounts after a specific date or period.

Installation site

  • One should install hardware such as Modbus Gateway behind at least a locked door.
  • One must report missing hardware and its certificates revoked ASAP.
  • Equipment must be password protected with a unique random password.
  • Equipment must connect over an encrypted channel.
  • Equipment must never expose itself on the public internet.
  • Equipment must continuously be updated with security patches.

Office

  • Employees at NODA are required to use Bitwarden for password management.
  • TOTP is enforced whenever possible. For the most important objects, U2F security keys (from Yubico) are used.
  • Employees' workstations/laptops are full-disk encrypted.
  • Employees' workstations/laptops must be updated with new security patches at a regular interval.
  • WiFi passwords to the office network are never shared with visitors or friends.

Servers

  • Software that exposes an interface to another system must always require authentication, even if the system exposes an interface in a "secure" environment.
  • Access to the server system is only allowed through an SSH bastion using certificate authentication. Only the DevOps team has access to this gateway.
  • One must never expose the Kubernetes API to the internet outside a maintenance window. During these windows, only a handful of selected IP addresses are allowed to communicate with the API endpoint.
  • Machines, Container and Software packages must be tracked for updated of security patches.

Code

  • Code in repositories is continuously scanned for new security vulnerabilities.
  • Whenever an issue is found, the code is patched, verified and deployed within the next available maintenance window.
  • Employees are only given access to a project they are working on.
  • Code is written with security in mind.
    • As few dependencies on external systems as possible.
    • Known libraries shall ONLY ever manage cryptography. Never implement a crypto-solution by yourself.
    • Having test cases for most of the code is key to having a stable code base.

Transparency

Infrastructure

Work environment

  • NODA allows its employees to work from home.
  • Employees use Linux, FreeBSD, Windows and macOS in their workstations/laptops.

Software

3rd-party solutions

  • The operating system in the Teltonika router is based on a Teltonika modified version of OpenWRT.

Examples

Modbus Gateway Installation

A NODA Modbus Gateway can connect to any Modbus TCP or RTU capable energy controller. The NODA Modbus Gateway then reads and writes values to the energy controller using the Modbus protocol.

Installation complexity varies depending on the installation scenario;

  • Freely programmable controller: Configurable Modbus layout and programmable logic.
  • Application-specific controller: Static Modbus layout with only parameterise logic.

A freely programmable controller has to be configured to expose the required values. An application-specific controller seldom has the option to change the Modbus layout. Nor is it often possible to handle a failsafe mode directly in the controller using software logic.

An application-specific controller may contain this feature if the specific feature was part of the requirements when the controller was designed.

To solve this problem, NODA has developed the NODA Modbus Gateway Addon. A device that sits between the energy controller and the NODA Modbus Gateway and provides the missing logic required to handle situations when a connection to the internet fails for several hours or days.

ArchitectureInstallation using the Modbus Gateway AddonclusterAWSIoTAWS IoTclusterSiteACustomer SiteIoT ServerIoT ServerModbus GatewayModbus GatewayModbus Gateway->IoT Server🔒Modbus Gateway AddonModbus Gateway Addon(optional)Modbus Gateway->Modbus Gateway AddonEnergy ControllerEnergy ControllerModbus Gateway Addon->Energy Controller

The NODA Modbus Gateway connect to the secure endpoint on AWS IoT. Data is then forwarded to the NODA system and handled by various processes. The system crunches the numbers and sends control signals back the controller via AWS IoT and the NODA Modbus Gateway.

Finally, a customer connects to the EnergyView (or My Pages) system to browse the data at their heart's content.

ArchitectureTypical Modbus Gateway installationclusterNodaPrivateNoda PrivateclusterNodaPublicNoda PublicclusterAWSIoTAWS IoTclusterSiteACustomer SiteDBMSDBMSMosquittoMosquittoMosquitto->DBMSEnergyViewEnergyViewEnergyView->DBMSIoT ServerIoT ServerIoT Server->Mosquitto🔒Modbus GatewayModbus GatewayModbus Gateway->IoT Server🔒Customer💻 CustomerCustomer->EnergyView🔒

Indoor Sensors Installation

There are several ways to get indoor sensor data into the NODA system.

The most common way is for equipment in the field to send data to NODA. This can be either via Wireless M-Bus gateways or via MQTT or HTTP from a gateway connected to a LoRa network.

These devices are often provisioned once and usually work for several years without intervention.

ArchitectureTypical Indoor Sensor installationclusterNodaPrivateNoda PrivateclusterNodaPublicNoda PublicclusterSiteCustomer SiteDBMSDBMSEnergyViewEnergyViewEnergyView->DBMSW-MBusW-MBusW-MBus->DBMSIndoor Sensors🌡️ Indoor SensorsIndoor Sensors->W-MBus🔒Customer💻 CustomerCustomer->EnergyView🔒

Typical logging intervals are between 5 and 15 minutes, depending on expected lifespan, technology and so forth. Once the data has landed in the NODA system it can be viewed by customers using either EnergyView or My Pages.

3rd Party Integration Installation

While not very common, NODA allows for customer specific intergrations. This is often solved by using the NODA EnergyView API or the NODA Self-host API.

ArchitectureTypical 3rd Party Integration installationclusterNodaPrivateNoda PrivateclusterNodaPublicNoda PublicclusterSiteCCustomer SiteDBMSDBMSEnergyViewEnergyViewEnergyView->DBMS3rd party solution3rd party solution3rd party solution->EnergyView🔒Customer💻 CustomerCustomer->EnergyView🔒

IEC Installation

NOTICE: This solution reaches end of life (EOL) on the 31st of December 2022.

The NODA IEC is a solution built in-house by NODA. It sits between an outdoor sensor (RTD) and the energy controller. The IEC measures the resistance of the outdoor sensors, converts it to a temperature, applies an offset (or not) and converts the new temperature back to a resistance value for the controller.

This solution has both benefits and drawbacks. Using this method, one can not control specific circuits in a building unless there is one controller for each circuit. In addition, everything affected by the outdoor temperature will be affected by an offset.

However, it's a simple concept and works well if used in the right circumstances.

ArchitectureTypical IEC installationclusterNodaPrivateNoda PrivateclusterNodaPublicNoda PublicclusterSiteACustomer SiteDBMSDBMSEnergyViewEnergyViewEnergyView->DBMSIEC SyncIEC SyncIEC Sync->DBMSIECIECIEC->IEC Sync🔒Customer💻 CustomerCustomer->EnergyView🔒

Since the IEC cannot query an energy controller for measured values, these are collected by installing surface-mounted 1-wire temperature sensors on the essential circuits.

Important usage and safety information

The following safety precautions must be observed during all phases of the operation, usage, service or repair of any NODA product.

Users of the product are advised to convey the following safety information to users and operating personnel and to incorporate these guidelines into all manuals supplied with the product. Failure to comply with these precautions violates safety standards of design, manufacture and intended use of the product.

NODA Intelligent Systems AB assumes no liability for customer’s failure to comply with these precautions.

The products are developed for indoor use only, unless clearly stated otherwize.

The installation of the product should be performed by a qualified electrician or another professional with the required knowledge. It is important to follow all safety information of this manual when installing the product.

Make sure to read this manual carefully and follow it step by step to ensure a secure usage and to get the most out of your product.

Mobile router introduction

Communication with equipment in the field can be solved using various solutions. Choosing one of these solutions always boils down to weighing functionality vs cost.

Using a customer's existing infrastructure to communicate with the internet is always a problem. Especially so, if the customer is unfamiliar with their own infrastructure.

As a result, NODA decided to go with a mobile router solution. A device which, on its own, connects to the internet via the 4G or 5G mobile network. Then, this mobile router connects to the energy controller (A regulator or similar device) via Modbus over either TCP or RTU.

All of this is secured by exchanging data over an encrypted MQTT connection.

NODA requires this level of interaction with the energy controller to get all required measurement values, along with the ability to modify control parameters. This way, the controller can go about its business doing what it's good at, controlling. Whilst being nudged in the right direction by the analytic processes provided by NODA.

Mobile router introduction

Communication with equipment in the field can be solved using various solutions. Choosing one of these solutions always boils down to weighing functionality vs cost.

Using a customer's existing infrastructure to communicate with the internet is always a problem. Especially so, if the customer is unfamiliar with their own infrastructure.

As a result, NODA decided to go with a mobile router solution. A device which, on its own, connects to the internet via the 4G or 5G mobile network. Then, this mobile router connects to the energy controller (A regulator or similar device) via Modbus over either TCP or RTU.

All of this is secured by exchanging data over an encrypted MQTT connection.

NODA requires this level of interaction with the energy controller to get all required measurement values, along with the ability to modify control parameters. This way, the controller can go about its business doing what it's good at, controlling. Whilst being nudged in the right direction by the analytic processes provided by NODA.

Hardware options

NODA relies on hardware from the manufacturer Teltonika.

The router we use and support are;

The RUT240 is primarily used as a Mobile router for wired ethernet devices, while the RUT950 and RUT955 series are mainly used as Modbus Gateway.

Remote management

An essential function of equipment deployed in the field is accessing these devices securely.

Devices such as routers always require software upgrades or maintenance to fix newly discovered security vulnerabilities.

Often this requires a VPN solution at the customer site. Or that each router connects as a client to a central management system using VPN.

The should be no situations where equipment is directly exposed to the internet. Such a solution is fraught with troubles down the line.

The NODA routers provided by Teltonika solve this problem by providing a secure connection using secured MQTT as a transport layer. The device connects to Teltonikas Remote Management System (RMS), where all devices are accessible and easily managed.

Introduction

NODA Modbus Gateway provides a reliable Modbus TCP master/slave solution where data transmits over a secure MQTT connection.

The Modbus Gateway acts as a Modbus TCP or RTU master/slave. It can communicate with any Modbus TCP slave connected via the LAN interface or act as a Modbus TCP slave. It can also communicate with any Modbus RTU slave connected via an RS-485.

Data is transmitted over the mobile network using a 4G or 5G modem internal to the gateway. The LAN interface or the RS-485 bus is not used to transfer outbound data to NODA. Only the WLAN connection via Wired Ethernet or Mobile Internet can access the internet.

For a list of limitations concerning the installation, see the details in Modbus support.

Introduction

NODA Modbus Gateway provides a reliable Modbus TCP master/slave solution where data transmits over a secure MQTT connection.

The Modbus Gateway acts as a Modbus TCP or RTU master/slave. It can communicate with any Modbus TCP slave connected via the LAN interface or act as a Modbus TCP slave. It can also communicate with any Modbus RTU slave connected via an RS-485.

Data is transmitted over the mobile network using a 4G or 5G modem internal to the gateway. The LAN interface or the RS-485 bus is not used to transfer outbound data to NODA. Only the WLAN connection via Wired Ethernet or Mobile Internet can access the internet.

For a list of limitations concerning the installation, see the details in Modbus support.

Compatibility requirements

For a list of known compatible devices, take a look at Manufacturer templates.

General requirements

A typical installation requires the ability to READ the following tags/values;

  • Outdoor temperature
  • Primary side flow (supply) temperature
  • Primary side return temperature
  • Primary side flow (supply) volume
  • Primary side volume
  • Primary side heat energy
  • Primary side heat power
  • Secondary side #1 flow temperature
  • Secondary side #1 return temperature
  • Current secondary side supply temperature

NOTE: If additional secondary side loops exist, they can also be included.

Along with the ability to WRITE the following tags/values;

  • Secondary side supply temperature offset

or

  • Forced secondary side supply temperature

Whichever depends on the limitations of the Modbus slave and the control system behind it.

NOTE: Specific use cases may require situation-specific solutions. In such a case, don't hesitate to get in touch with NODA for further support.

Components

The NODA Modbus Gateway consists of;

  • Teltonika Mobile Router
  • Antennas
  • Power Supply Unit
  • SIM-card (may be omitted)
  • Modbus Gateway Addon (required for certain energy controllers)

Teltonika Hardware options

There are two different hardware options available;

RUT950

The RUT950 is a 4G router. It comes with 3 LAN (Ethernet) ports and 1 WAN (Ethernet) port. This option is well suited for use with freely programmable energy controllers with support for Modbus TCP.

RUT955

The RUT955 is a 4G router. It comes with 3 LAN (Ethernet) ports and 1 WAN (Ethernet) port; it also has 1 RS-485 port and 1 RS-232 port, along with a few generic I/O ports. This option is well suited for use with freely programmable energy controllers with support for Modbus TCP or Modbus RTU.

Introduction

The NODA Modbus Gateway Addon acts as a tiny external brain-aid for application-specific energy controllers.

Whenever a controller cannot handle the logic required to return to zero from an affected state, this solution is needed to restore the default state on the controller.

For example, if an offset of the supply temperature on the secondary side is 6.5 degrees Celsius and the internet connection goes down. Then, the controller will happily continue with the same 6.5 degrees offset until internet connectivity is restored. For a worst-case scenario, this can take several days.

This addon's sole purpose is to add logic to the energy controller without putting it in the environment of an operating system that is frankly less stable than a microcontroller's.

Components

The hardware we choose, 10 I/O's Digital Module is made by the Spanish company; Boot and Work Corp S.L. (Industrial Shields).

The hardware is built around an ESP32 and supports the Arduino Development Environment.

In the future, we aim to support several off-the-shelf Arduino-compatible products from different manufacturers.

Communication

The NODA Modbus Gateway Addon can communicate with Modbus devices over either Modbus TCP (Ethernet) or Modbus RTU (RS-485).

The solution uses the same protocol over MQTT as the NODA Modbus Gateway.

Modbus TCP

Communication with any Modbus TCP compatible Modbus Slave is possible over any port.

See the Setup section for more details about configuring the Modbus TCP support.

Modbus RTU

The communication protocol does not support specifying an RS-485 target. Instead, only IP targets are supported.

To get around this limitation, the NODA Modbus Gateway Addon assigns special meaning to the IPv4 loopback addresses. The loopback address of 127.1.1.1 is used as a way to forward a request to the RS-485 interface. The TCP port (typically 502) is silently ignored in such a request.

See the Setup section for more details about how to configure the RS-485 support.

Setup of Modbus Gateway Addon

Once powered on, the Addon will either request an IP address via DHCP or use the static IP configured via the user-interface.

When connected to a NODA Modbus Gateway, the Addon device will be assigned the IP 192.168.1.100.

Access the user-interface by entering the following in a web-browser; http://192.168.1.100.

It's is highly recommended to access this page in "incognito" or "private window" to avoid issues with password caching.

Login

The username is admin.

The password is unique for each device and can be requested from NODA.

Configuration

The following parameters can be changed.

Network

  • MAC address: The MAC address can be changed here if required.
  • Static IP: Assigning a static IP will disable DHCP. An empty field will active DHCP.
  • Static DNS: Required if static IP is used.
  • Static subnet: Required if static IP is used. On the form 255.255.255.255.

RS485 (for Modbus RTU)

  • Baudrate: The speed over the RS-485 network. All devices must use the same speed.
  • Mode: e.g. 8N1 or 7E1 etc.

MQTT

  • ClientID: Identifier used when connecting to an MQTT broker.
  • Host: The IP of the MQTT broker.
  • Port: The TCP port of the MQTT broker.
  • Username: Optional username used to connect to the MQTT broker.
  • Password: Optional password used to connect to the MQTT broker.

Failover

  • Communication timeout: The number of seconds without any data over MQTT, after which the device switches to failover state.
  • On communication error: A list of instruction to execute when switching to a failover state. These instructions are used to clear any offset and return the energy controller to a clean-state.

Password

  • WebUI Password: Used to change the password of the Web-UI.

Modbus support

Since Modbus was designed in the late 1970s to communicate to programmable logic controllers, the number of data types is limited to those understood by PLCs at the time. Therefore, large binary objects are not supported.

No standard way exists for a master device to find the description of a data object, for example, to determine whether a register value represents a temperature between 25 and 98 degrees Celsius.

Therefore the mapping and structure of the data have to be established for successful interoperability, as a client may store values not only in a single register but in several adjacent holding registers.

Limitations in the protocol support

As of this writing, the software used by NODA to achive communication with energy control equipment via Modbus over MQTT, is limited to the support implemented by Teltonika in their equipment.

This limits the available commands to send over Modbus to only Write Single Holding Register (6), Write Multiple Holding Registers (16) and Read Holding Registers (3). There is thus currently no support for reading and writing to coils and reading discrete inputs.

Single holding register data types

  • 8 Bit Unsigned Integer (uint8)
  • 8 Bit Signed Integer (int8)
  • 16 Bit Unsigned Integer (uint16)
  • 16 Bit Signed Integer (int16)
  • 16 Bit Float (float16)

Multi (2) holding registers data types

  • 32 Bit Unsigned Integer (uint32)
  • 32 Bit Signed Integer (int32)
  • 32 Bit Float (float32)

Both Word and Byte order can be Little- or Big Endian. But the order has to be consistent throughout.

NOTE: While NODA Modbus Gateway supports the above data types, your specific target slave device might not be able to handle them. Please refer to the manual for the slave device for details.

RS-485 limitations

The RS-485 driver can drive a maximum of 32 receivers, provided that the receiver input impedance is 12 k$\Omega$. If receiver impedances are higher, the maximum number of receivers in the network increases. Any combination of receiver types can be connected, provided their parallel impedance does not exceed $Rload > 375 \Omega$.

Solution for complete protocol support

To get around the current limitations in the Teltonika router, NODA implemented a separate solution with the capability of acting as an alternative to the Teltonika software in their router. This solution still requires Teltonika router to access the internet in a secure way. For more details about this solution take a look at the Modbus Gateway Addon

Recommendations

Depending on the usage scenario, limitations or flexibilities in the Modbus TCP slave, the data mapping will vary. Therefore, the following mapping is only the prefered mapping by NODA. As such, it can be changed in agreement with NODA to match the specific situation.

Modbus mapping for a typical building

Word Order: Big Endian
Byte Order: Little Endian

OrderValue nameEncodingAmplificationUnitDirectionFunction Code
1Outdoortempuint161/100CelciusRead3
2Outdoortemp Offsetuint161/100KelvinWrite6
3Primary Flow (Supply) Temperatureint161/100CelciusRead3
4Primary Return Temperatureint161/100CelciusRead3
5Primary Flow Volumeint161/10*l/h*Read3
6Primary Side Volumeint161/10*m3*Read3
7Primary Heat Energyint161/10*MWh*Read3
8Primary Heat Powerint161/10*kW*Read3
9Secondary Side (#1) Flowint161/100CelciusRead3
10Secondary Side (#1) Returnint161/100CelciusRead3
11Secondary Side (#2) Flowint161/100CelciusRead3
12Secondary Side (#2) Returnint161/100CelciusRead3
.....................
XXSecondary Side (#n) Flowint161/100CelciusRead3
XXSecondary Side (#n) Returnint161/100CelciusRead3

* Depends on specific circumstances

The structure outlined in the table can repeat if the Modbus TCP slave interfaces with several regulators and or control points.

NOTE: If additional secondary side circuits exist, they should be included.

NOTE: Holding register numbers are intentionally not outlined as they likely will vary from one Modbus TCP slave to another.

Installation preparation

The NODA Modbus Gateway comes prepared with all necessary certificates to connect to the NODA MQTT network securely.

Modbus TCP

For access to the Modbus TCP slave(s) or acting as a Modbus TCP slave itself. The NODA Modbus Gateway will need either a static or dynamic (DHCP) IP assigned to it in the LAN.

Don't hesitate to contact the network administrator as this information is only known to, and can be handled by, the network administrator. Once an IP number is assigned to the NODA Modbus Gateway, either via static or dynamic assignment, these details should be communicated to NODA, as they are required for device setup on the LAN.

NOTE: If the network administrator requests a MAC address. This address is labelled as LAN MAC on the underside of the NODA Modbus Gateway. If the label is missing or has been damaged, please get in touch with NODA for help.

Modbus RTU

To access Modbus RTU slave(s), the NODA Modbus Gateway will need access to an RS-485 network. Details on how an RS-485 network works are out of scope for this document.

To access Modbus RTU slave(s), the RS-485 bus configuration is required.

Default values are highlighted in bold.

  • Baud rate (300, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600 or 115200)
  • Parity bits (none, odd, even)
  • Stop bits (1, 2)
  • Flow Control: (None, Xon/Xoff)
  • Slave id or range of slave ids: (1-247)

Installation

The supplied DIN rail mount is the recommended way to mount the NODA Modbus Gateway. This may be in any larger installation cabinet, smaller installation box or similar. If the equipment is safe from water damage and dust ingress, it can be mounted without a separate enclosure as a last resort.

Estimation of time required for installation

The time required depends on a few factors;

  • Familiarity with previous installations of NODA Modbus Gateway equipment.
  • Familiarity with the control equipment.
  • Knowledge of connecting Ethernet networks or RS485-bus networks.
  • If the controller is freely programmable or an application-specific controller.

The tasks required for installation are (in general);

  • Contact NODA and make a plan for installation a few days ahead of time
  • Get to the installation location
  • Find the energy controller
  • Ensure that one can manage the controller over Modbus TCP / RTU
  • Locate a suitable mounting location for the NODA Modbus Gateway
  • Mount the equipment
  • Wire the controller and NODA Modbus Gateway equipment together
  • Configure the controller (often only required for freely programmable controllers)
  • Validate the installation with NODA deployment staff

A skilled technician can perform these tasks in less than four hours without taking into account time for getting to the location, establishing a work environment and clean-up.

Mounting location

The NODA Modbus Gateway connects to the NODA MQTT network via the mobile network (4G / 5G). Therefore, install the device in a location where wireless transmission is allowed and the appliance can acquire a wireless signal.

Inside a larger installation cabinett

This option is one of the most well-suited installation locations. The equipment is safe from the environment, and if the cabinet is locked also secured from unauthorized access. Remember that the cabinet may work as a signal shield against the mobile network, resulting in a very low or no signal for the NODA Modbus Gateway. In this situation, your only option is to exchange the included antennas for antennas with an extension cord.

Inside a separate plastic box / enclosure

Another suitable choice is to use a larger box with a DIN rail to mount the NODA Modbus Gateway and the power supply. This box can be placed upwards to 50 meters from the controller if one can find no suitable location in the vicinity.

Without a protective enclose

As a last resort, one can mount the NODA Modbus Gateway directly on any suitable surface as long as the risk of water or dust ingress is low.

Configuration of the NODA Modbus Gateway

Configuration of the NODA Modbus Gateway is done remotely by NODA deployment staff. Depending on the installation scenario and the prep work done.

This configuration can often be done ahead of the shipment of the equipment. If any equipment configuration is required in the field, then once the equipment is connected to the internet, it can be accessed by the NODA deployment staff.

Power supply

The NODA Modbus Gateway is powered by the supplied power supply or any 9-30V industrial power supply.

Power Socket

Ethernet

When acting as a Modbus master, the NODA Modbus Gateway will connect to the network (LAN) via a switch from the ethernet port marked LAN1. However, suppose the slave device is not already on a LAN. In that case, one can directly connect the device to the NODA Modbus Gateway on the ethernet port marked LAN1 or the next available LAN port if used in conjunction with a NODA Modbus Gateway Addon.

Ethernet Ports

When acting as a Modbus slave, the NODA Modbus Gateway will provide a Modbus TCP interface with a defined Holding Register scope on the LAN1 port. The default port number for this is 502.

RS-485

Wire the NODA Modbus Gateway to the network by using the following pinout.

RS-485 Pinout

4-wire network

If the NODA Modbus Gateway is wired to a 4-wire network (separate request and reply buses), then wire the D_P pin and the D_N pin to the request bus and wire the R_P pin and the R_N pin to the reply bus.

2-wire network

If the NODA Modbus Gateway is wired to a 2-wire network (single request and reply bus), bridge the pin D_P to the R_P pin and the D_N pin to the R_N pin before connecting to the bus.

Wiring

Modbus Gateway without Addon

Installation without the NODA Modbus Gateway Addon only works if the energy controller can be programmed (freely programmable controller). If the controller is an application-specific controller, then the NODA Modbus Gateway Addon is required.

Connect the energy controller to the NODA Modbus Gateway using either; Ethernet or RS-485.

Modbus Gateway with Addon

If you are using a NODA Modbus Gateway Addon, then see details in Addon > Wiring.

Setup

Once installed and up and running. The NODA Modbus Gateway should be visible in Teltonika RMS. Suppose you don't have access to this tool. Then contact NODA support for acknowledgement.

When a connection to Teltonika RMS has been established, you can continue with the Setup step.

Setup

Further network setup (see the Preparation section) is done remotely by NODA personnel via a remote management system once the NODA Modbus Gateway has successfully connected to the internet via the mobile network.

NOTE: For highly skilled technicians, if required, NODA can provide temporary access to the web interface of the NODA Modbus Gateway.

Slave device setup

The Modbus TCP/RTU slave device should be configured by a professional with the required knowledge of the specific equipment. Specifics on this task is out of scope for this document. Please refer to the technical manual for the particular slave device.

TCP Gateway setup

Ethernet Network

The default IP on the LAN interface for the NODA Modbus Gateway is 192.168.1.1. However, one can change the IP if the network requires it.

Ethernet Firewall

Suppose an optional and appropriately recommended firewall limits the communication between NODA Modbus Gateway and the Modbus TCP slave(s). In that case, the recommended solution is to port-forward the traffic over the firewall from the NODA Modbus Gateway and on to the target Modbus TCP slave on the LAN.

Such configuration is out of the scope of this document and should generally be handled by a network administrator.

RTU Gateway setup

If the settings for the RS-485 port matches the RS-485 network, there should be no further setup necessary.

Server-side request setup

Data exchange setup between the NODA Modbus Gateway and the Modbus TCP slave(s) is done via the online tool EnergyView, using administrative credentials. This step is out of scope for this document.

For help and more information on this, don't hesitate to get in touch with NODA.

Templates

Each energy controller is often unique in its particular, unique way. Still, manufacturers often retain the same patterns and layout throughout their offerings.

This section provides a verified list of required Modbus values in a controller to allow full functionality of the NODA Modbus Gateway.

Each template contains a details explanation of how to handle that specific controller.

Manufacturers

Select a manufacturer to get a list of supported controllers and mapping.

Abelko controllers

https://abelko.se/produkter/

More documentation coming soon. :)

Bastec controllers

Integration with a Bastec controller is over Modbus TCP (Ethernet). The preferred setup is to use a NODA Modbus Gateway as a Modbus Slave.

The Bastec controller is freely programmable.

Table of Content

BAS2 XE16

ModelSupportedDetails
BAS2 XE16-LT❌ NoMissing Modbus support
BAS2 XE16-COM✅ YesSee details here.
BAS2 XE16-COM V2✅ YesSee details here.

BAS2 XL13

ModelSupportedDetails
BAS2 XL13✅ YesSee details here.

Modbus values

Using the following layout, at most four (4) heating systems are supported.

Scaling of integer values

Scale (factor) is used to transform a decimal value into an integer value by multiplying it with that value. This is often required as simple computers are often bad at handling decimal values. As a result, we lose the decimal part when converting a decimal value to an integer value.

For example, if the value 3.1415 is to be managed in such a way, it can be scaled using 10, 100, 1000 or even 10000. Giving us the integer values; 31, 314, 3141 or 31415.

These integer values can then be transmitted to a more intelligent computer, where they are divided by the same factor to produce a decimal value once more.

Remember that the scale factor decides how many decimals are retained once converted back to a decimal value.

Outdoor sensors

The following values are available as Holding Registers.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
12001100Outdoor temperature HS1
 
13001100Outdoor temperature HS2
 
14001100Outdoor temperature HS3
 
15001100Outdoor temperature HS4

Supply and Return temperature

The following values are available as Holding Registers.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
12011100Supply temperature HS1
12021100Return temperature HS1
 
13011100Supply temperature HS2
13021100Return temperature HS2
 
14011100Supply temperature HS3
14021100Return temperature HS3
 
15011100Supply temperature HS4
15021100Return temperature HS4

Calculated supply temperature

The following values are available as Holding Registers.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
12031100Calculated supply setpoint HS1
 
13031100Calculated supply setpoint HS2
 
14031100Calculated supply setpoint HS3
 
15031100Calculated supply setpoint HS4

M-Bus Heat Meter

The following values are available as Holding Registers.

All M-Bus values are 32-bit wide and takes up two Holding Registers. They are organized in order as High Word and then Low Word.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
121021000Energy, Heat Meter HS1 (MWh)
1212210Power, Heat Meter HS1 (kW)
121421Flow, Heat Meter HS1 (l/h)
121621Supply temperature, Heat Meter HS1 (C)
121821Return temperature, Heat Meter HS1 (C)
12202100Volume, Heat Meter HS1 (m3)
 
131021000Energy, Heat Meter HS2 (MWh)
1312210Power, Heat Meter HS2 (kW)
131421Flow, Heat Meter HS2 (l/h)
131621Supply temperature, Heat Meter HS2 (C)
131821Return temperature, Heat Meter HS2 (C)
13202100Volume, Heat Meter HS2 (m3)
 
141021000Energy, Heat Meter HS3 (MWh)
1412210Power, Heat Meter HS3 (kW)
141421Flow, Heat Meter HS3 (l/h)
141621Supply temperature, Heat Meter HS3 (C)
141821Return temperature, Heat Meter HS3 (C)
14202100Volume, Heat Meter HS3 (m3)
 
151021000Energy, Heat Meter HS4 (MWh)
1512210Power, Heat Meter HS4 (kW)
151421Flow, Heat Meter HS4 (l/h)
151621Supply temperature, Heat Meter HS4 (C)
151821Return temperature, Heat Meter HS4 (C)
15202100Volume, Heat Meter HS4 (m3)

Offset of supply temperature

The following values are available as Holding Registers.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
12301100Parallel transfer of setpoint-curve HS1
 
13301100Parallel transfer of setpoint-curve HS2
 
14301100Parallel transfer of setpoint-curve HS3
 
15301100Parallel transfer of setpoint-curve HS4

Watchdog / Failover

The following values are available as Holding Registers.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
129011Watchdog counter

There is only one (1) watchdog counter, and that is for the first HS. All related logic should use the same counter as a way to determine that any offset done to the system is a frozen value.

Suppose the counter hasn't changed in 30 minutes. The controller should reset the "Offset of supply temperature" to zero (0). The controller should automatically re-activate the offset when the counter starts working again.

Installation

Installation requires a NODA Modbus Gateway.

Installation steps can be found under Modbus Gateway > Installation.

Setup

Before performing this step. Please ensure that you have finished all necessary steps in Modbus Gateway > Installation.

To complete the following steps, administrative access to NODA EnergyView is required. If you do not have administrative access to NODA EnergyView then setup has to be carried out by NODA support personell.

For each heating system controlled, NODA requires the following;

  • Outdoor sensors (C)
  • Supply and return temperature (C)
  • Offset of supply temperature (K)
  • M-Bus Heat Meter values
    • Supply and return temperature (C)
    • Energy (MWh)
    • Power (kW)
    • Volume (m3)
    • Flow (l/h)
  • Calculated supply temperature (C)

M-Bus Heat Meter values may be omitted if these values are transferred to NODA's system in some other way than via the Bastec controller.

Roles

  • The NODA Modbus Gateway acts as a Modbus Slave.
  • The Bastec controller acts as a Modbus Master.

The following mapping is a recommended example of a single heating system installation. However, extend the mapping accordingly if there is more than one heating system.

Holding registers

Modbus NumberValue typeMultiplicationDirectionSensor target
120016 bit signed integer0.01GEToutdoortemp (C)
120116 bit signed integer0.01GETsupplytemp_sec (C)
120216 bit signed integer0.01GETreturntemp_sec (C)
120316 bit signed integer0.01GETsupplytemp_sec_controller_setvalue (K)
121032 bit signed integer0.001GETmeter_heatenergy (MWh)
121232 bit signed integer0.1GETmeter_effect (kW)
121432 bit signed integer1GETmeter_volumeflow (l/h)
121632 bit signed integer1GETmeter_primsupplytemp (C)
121832 bit signed integer1GETmeter_primreturntemp (C)
122032 bit signed integer0.01GETmeter_volume (m3)

Holding registers

Modbus NumberValue typeMultiplicationDirectionSensor target
123016 bit signed integer100SETsupplytemp_sec_offset (C)
129016 bit signed integer1SETwatchdog (number)

Beckhoff controllers

More documentation coming soon. :)

Danfoss controllers

Integration with a Danfoss controller is over Modbus TCP (Ethernet) or Modbus RTU (RS-485). The NODA Modbus Gateway as a Modbus Client/Master and the Danfoss controller acts as a Server/Slave.

The Danfoss controller is application-specific and requires separate Application Key for different scenarios.

ModelSupportedDetails
ECL Comfort 210📚 WIPSee details here.
ECL Comfort 296📚 WIPSee details here.
ECL Comfort 310📚 WIPSee details here.

Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Applications

A2XX applications

A3XX applications

P3XX applications

P5XX applications

Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A207

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A214

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A217

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A230

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A231

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A232

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A237

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A247

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A260

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A266

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A267

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A275

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A302

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A314

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A315

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A318

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A319

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A331

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A332

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Application A332.3

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Application A332.4

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A333

This application contains 3 variant(s)

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Application A333.1

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Application A333.2

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Application A333.3

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A347

This application contains 3 variant(s)

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Application A347.1

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Application A347.2

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Application A347.3

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A361

This application contains 2 variant(s)

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Application A361.1

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Application A361.2

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A362

This application contains 1 variant(s)

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Application A362.1

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A367

This application contains 2 variant(s)

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Application A367.1

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Application A367.2

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A368

This application contains 6 variant(s)

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Application A368.1

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Application A368.2

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Application A368.5

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Application A368.6

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A375

This application contains 5 variant(s)

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Application A375.1

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A376

This application contains 6 variant(s)

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Application A376.1

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Application A376.9

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Application A376.10

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A377

This application contains 3 variant(s)

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Application A377.1

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Application A377.2

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Application A377.3

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application A390

This application contains 6 variant(s)

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Application A390.1

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application P302

This application contains 1 variant(s)

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Application P302.1

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application P314

This application contains 7 variant(s)

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Application P314.4

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application P318

This application contains 6 variant(s)

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Application P318.1

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Application P318.21

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application P330

This application contains 15 variant(s)

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Application P330.1

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Application P330.2

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application P348

This application contains 3 variant(s)

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Application P348.1

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Danfoss ECL210/296/310 Application P501

This application contains 3 variant(s)

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Application P501.1

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Application P501.11

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Danfoss ECL 210/296/310

A controller supports three different ways of receiving external offset signals;

  • SCADA outdoor temperature (C)
  • SCADA heat offset (-10 to +10 K)
    • Up to four circuits are supported.
  • Offset/adjustment of measurement for port S1 to S10.

Via SCADA outdoor temperature, the regulator's current outdoor temperature gets replaced with any value written.

Via SCADA heat offset, a range limited offset is applied to the four possible circuits, 1 to 4.

Adjustment of measurements on port S1 to S10 should be avoided as a way to perform external control.

Table of Content

Hardware

The ECL hardware platform supports up to ten (10) signal inputs. They range from S1 to S10. Depending on the Application selected for the circumstances of the installation of the controller, these signal inputs will have different purposes, such as temperature or pressure sensors for various points in the installation.

Interfaces

The ECL 296 and 310 supports Modbus TCP and Modbus RTU. The ECL 210 only supports Modbus RTU.

Applications

An ECL controller supports many different scenarios. The hardware is the same; the only thing that changes is the software. Danfoss supplies these Applications as separate components of an installation. With prices vary depending on the functionality.

For details about the various Applications, see the Danfoss store. If the link doesn't work, then use your common sense and a search engine.

Some typical applications are;

  • A230: Heating control with wind compensation. Cooling control.
  • A260: 2 x heating control
  • A266: Heating and DHW control
  • A302: Zone control

Modbus

For an extended explaination of the Modbus protocol, see the educational material.

Noteable sections include;

Supported functions

The controller only supports Holding Registers. The functions supported are;

  • 03 (0x03) Read Holding Registers
  • 04 (0x04) Read Input Registers
  • 06 (0x06) Write Single Register

Sensors

The controller exposes all sensor values (S1-S10) either as raw or non-raw values in two different segments.

The following values are available as Holding Registers.

Raw sensor values

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
1020116-bit100S1 Raw
1020216-bit100S2 Raw
1020316-bit100S3 Raw
1020416-bit100S4 Raw
1020516-bit100S5 Raw
1020616-bit100S6 Raw
1020716-bit100S7 Raw
1020816-bit100S8 Raw
1020916-bit100S9 Raw
1021016-bit100S10 Raw

Non-raw sensor values

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
1120116-bit100S1 (Sensor 1)
1120216-bit100S2 (Sensor 2)
1120316-bit100S3 (Sensor 3)
1120416-bit100S4 (Sensor 4)
1120516-bit100S5 (Sensor 5)
1120616-bit100S6 (Sensor 6)
1120716-bit100S7 (Sensor 7)
1120816-bit100S8 (Sensor 8)
1120916-bit100S9 (Sensor 9)
1121016-bit100S10 (Sensor 10)

Outdoor sensors

It seems that S1 is always the outdoor temperature sensor for all Applications. However, this is not guaranteed. Always check the Application specification.

The example below is taken from A230.1.

The following values are available as Holding Registers.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
1120116-bit100S1 (Outdoor temperature)

Supply and Return temperature

The example below is taken from A230.1.

The following values are available as Holding Registers.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
1120316-bit100Supply temperature HS1 (S3)
1120516-bit100Return temperature primary side (S5)

Offset of supply temperature

In the Danfoss ECL Comfort 210/296/310 documentation. This is described as SCADA Heat Offset.

The example below is taken from A230.1.

It seems that these registers are always the same for all Applications.

Allowed range is -100 (65436) and +100 (100), i.e. -10 Kelvin and +10 Kelvin.

The following values are available as Holding Registers.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
1040116-bit10Supply setpoint offset for HS1
 
1040216-bit10Supply setpoint offset for HS2
 
1040316-bit10Supply setpoint offset for HS3
 
1040416-bit10Supply setpoint offset for HS4

M-Bus Heat Meter

Only available on ECL Comfort 296/310.

It seems that these registers are always the same for all Applications.

32-bit values are integer values.

The following values are available as Holding Registers.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
600616-bit100Flow temperature, Heat Meter HS1 (C)
600716-bit100Return temperature, Heat Meter HS1 (C)
6008,600932-bit?Flow, Heat Meter HS1 (l/h)
6010,601132-bit?Power, Heat Meter HS1 (kW)
6012,601332-bit10Accumulated Volume, Heat Meter HS1 (m3)
6014,601532-bit10Accumulated Energy, Heat Meter HS1 (kWh)
 
605616-bit100Flow temperature, Heat Meter HS2 (C)
605716-bit100Return temperature, Heat Meter HS2 (C)
6058,605932-bit?Flow, Heat Meter HS2 (l/h)
6060,606132-bit?Power, Heat Meter HS2 (kW)
6062,606332-bit10Accumulated Volume, Heat Meter HS2 (m3)
6064,606532-bit10Accumulated Energy, Heat Meter HS2 (kWh)
 
610616-bit100Flow temperature, Heat Meter HS3 (C)
610716-bit100Return temperature, Heat Meter HS3 (C)
6108,610932-bit?Flow, Heat Meter HS3 (l/h)
6110,611132-bit?Power, Heat Meter HS3 (kW)
6112,611332-bit10Accumulated Volume, Heat Meter HS3 (m3)
6114,611532-bit10Accumulated Energy, Heat Meter HS3 (kWh)
 
615616-bit100Flow temperature, Heat Meter HS4 (C)
615716-bit100Return temperature, Heat Meter HS4 (C)
6158,615932-bit?Flow, Heat Meter HS4 (l/h)
6160,616132-bit?Power, Heat Meter HS4 (kW)
6162,616332-bit10Accumulated Volume, Heat Meter HS4 (m3)
6164,616532-bit10Accumulated Energy, Heat Meter HS4 (kWh)
 
620616-bit100Flow temperature, Heat Meter HS5 (C)
620716-bit100Return temperature, Heat Meter HS5 (C)
6208,620932-bit?Flow, Heat Meter HS5 (l/h)
6210,621132-bit?Power, Heat Meter HS5 (kW)
6212,621332-bit10Accumulated Volume, Heat Meter HS5 (m3)
6214,621532-bit10Accumulated Energy, Heat Meter HS5 (kWh)

Calculated supply temperature

The following values are available as Holding Registers.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
1125116-bit10?S1 sensor reference (set-point, etc.)
1125216-bit10?S2 sensor reference (set-point, etc.)
1125316-bit10?S3 sensor reference (set-point, etc.)
1125416-bit10?S4 sensor reference (set-point, etc.)
1125516-bit10?S5 sensor reference (set-point, etc.)
1125616-bit10?S6 sensor reference (set-point, etc.)
1125716-bit10?S7 sensor reference (set-point, etc.)
1125816-bit10?S8 sensor reference (set-point, etc.)
1125916-bit10?S9 sensor reference (set-point, etc.)
1126016-bit10?S10 sensor reference (set-point, etc.)

Watchdog / Failover

ECL 210/296/310 controllers use an internal watchdog for all SCADA values.

There is a poorly documented SCADA (before 2022) variable hidden at Modbus Number (PNU) 10399.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescriptionNote
1039916-bit1SCADA time-out (minutes)Available from FW 1.54

This value represents the number of minutes (Time-To-Live) after which any SCADA offset returns to zero (0).

This should be changed to 30 (minutes).

SCADA offset type

ECL 210/296/310 controllers use a control register to define the type of SCADA offset.

The value is a bitmask. Which, in order of least significant bit, represents the offset type for Modbus Number 10400 up to 10404.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescriptionNote
1039816-bit1SCADA bitmask for offset typeAvailable from FW 2.10

The bit value 0 represents relative offset. While 1 represents absolut offset.

For example, an 8bit value of 0b00010010 (18) activetes absolute offset for HS1 and HS4. While setting outdoortemp, HS2, HS3 remains as relative offset.

This should (in most cases) be set to 0 (all relative offset).

Installation

A NODA Modbus Gateway is required for installation.

Installation steps can be found under Modbus Gateway > Installation.

Setup

Before performing this step. Please ensure that you have finished all necessary steps in Modbus Gateway > Installation.

To complete the following steps, administrative access to NODA EnergyView is required. If you do not have administrative access to NODA EnergyView then setup has to be carried out by NODA support personell.

For each heating system controlled, NODA requires the following;

  • Outdoor sensors (C)
  • Supply and return temperature (C)
  • Offset of supply temperature (K)
  • M-Bus Heat Meter values
    • Supply and return temperature (C)
    • Energy (MWh)
    • Power (kW)
    • Volume (m3)
    • Flow (l/h)
  • Calculated supply temperature (C)

M-Bus Heat Meter values may be omitted if these values are transferred to NODA's system in some other way than via the Danfoss controller.

Roles

  • The NODA Modbus Gateway acts as a Modbus Client/Master and as a secure transport of data from and to the internet.
  • The Danfoss controller acts as a Modbus Server/Slave.

Wiring

Ethernet

The NODA Modbus Gateway can be connected to the ECL controller either via the LAN1 port on the NODA Modbus Gateway or via the WAN port to an existing LAN network. For more details on this see NODA Modbus Gateway: Ethernet.

RS-485

An ECL 210/296/310 can be connected via Modbus RTU over RS-485. This is done via the screw terminals 34 (B), 35 (A), 36 (S. Gnd). The bus must be terminated using 120 Ohm resistors.

All devices in the network must use the same communication settings. Multiple communication settings are not allowed;

  • 9600, 19200 or 38400 (default) baud rate
  • 1 start bit
  • 8 data bits
  • even parity
  • 1 stop bit

(a total of 11 bits).

RS-485 Pinout

  • RS-485 (A) should be wired to D_N and R_N.
  • RS-485 (B) should be wired to D_P and R_P.
  • RS-485 (GND) should be wired to GND.

For more details on this see NODA Modbus Gateway: RS-485.

USB Serial

The USB interface on the ECL Comfort 210/296/310 exposes an Modbus RTU interface.

As an alternative to the RS-485 interface, this interface can be used together with an RUT955/956 and the "USB Serial" support.

The following mapping is a recommended example of a single heating system installation using the A230.1 Application.

For other Applications you are required to extend this example as needed.

Holding registers

Modbus NumberValue typeMultiplicationDirectionSensor target
600616-bit signed integer0.01GETmeter_primsupplytemp (C)
600716-bit signed integer0.01GETmeter_primreturntemp (C)
6008,600932-bit signed integer?GETmeter_volumeflow (l/h)
6010,601132-bit signed integer?GETmeter_effect (kW)
6012,601332-bit unsigned integer0.1GETmeter_volume (m3)
6014,601532-bit unsigned integer0.0001GETmeter_heatenergy (MWh)
1120116-bit signed integer0.01GEToutdoortemp (C)
1120316-bit signed integer0.01GETsupplytemp_sec (C)
1120516-bit signed integer0.01GETreturntemp_sec (C)
1125316-bit signed integer0.01GETsupplytemp_sec_controller_setvalue (C)

Holding registers

Modbus NumberValue typeMultiplicationDirectionSensor target
1040116-bit signed integer10SETsupplytemp_sec_offset (K)

ERAB controllers

More documentation coming soon. :)

Fidelix controllers

More documentation coming soon. :)

Honeywell / TREND controllers

More documentation coming soon. :)

KTC controllers

More documentation coming soon. :)

Regin controllers

Most Regin controllers use the same variable list (4.3) Making each variation of a product almost the same from a variable perspective.

Depending on the controller, there is support for up to 4 different heating systems. However, a typical NODA Modbus Gateway only manages one (1) Heating System.

A NODA Modbus Gateway Addon is required to be able to read Discrete Inputs from the Regin controller. Along with the support for watchdog/failover functionality.

Both Modbus TCP and Modbus RTU are supported with the NODA Modbus Gateway Addon

Table of Content

Getting the version information

First, ensure that you are on the start page to get the version information from a Regin controller.

Then Press the Right button (arrow right) three (3) times to reach the Program details. Here you will find a version string in the format X.Y-x-y, with a date string. At the bottom of the screen, you will see a serial number.

Press the Right button (arrow right) twice (2) to reach another version information screen. Here you will find something along the line of EXOreal C and a version string in the format X.Y-x-y.

Exigo Ardo

ModelSupportedImplementationRegin documentation
HCA152W-4✅ YesClick for detailsExigo v4.3
HCA152DW-4✅ YesClick for detailsExigo v4.3
HCA282DW-4✅ YesClick for detailsExigo v4.3
HCA283WM-4✅ YesClick for detailsExigo v4.3
HCA283DWM-4✅ YesClick for detailsExigo v4.3

Exigo Vido

ModelSupportedImplementationRegin documentation
HCV191DW-2✅ YesClick for detailsExigo v4.3
HCV192DW-2✅ YesClick for detailsExigo v4.3
HCV203DWM-2✅ YesClick for detailsExigo v4.3

Corrigo Ardo

Modbus Mapping for Regin Exigo Ardo & Exigo Vido

Table of Content

Modbus

For an extended explaination of the Modbus protocol, see the educational material.

Noteable sections include;

Outdoor sensors

The following values are available as Discrete Inputs.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
116-bit10Outdoor temperature HS1
 
216-bit10Outdoor temperature HS2
 
316-bit10Outdoor temperature HS3
 
416-bit10Outdoor temperature HS4

Supply and Return temperature

The following values are available as Discrete Inputs.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
2616-bit10Supply temperature HS1
2816-bit10Return temperature HS1
 
4416-bit10Supply temperature HS2
4616-bit10Return temperature HS2
 
6216-bit10Supply temperature HS3
6416-bit10Return temperature HS3
 
8016-bit10Supply temperature HS4
8216-bit10Return temperature HS4

Calculated supply temperature

The following values are available as Discrete Inputs.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
3216-bit10Calculated supply setpoint HS1
 
5016-bit10Calculated supply setpoint HS2
 
6816-bit10Calculated supply setpoint HS3
 
8616-bit10Calculated supply setpoint HS4

Offset of supply temperature

The following values are available as Holding Registers.

Allowed range is -100 (65436) and +100 (100), i.e. -10 Celsius and +10 Celsius.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
5016-bit10Parallel transfer of setpoint-curve HS1
 
9916-bit10Parallel transfer of setpoint-curve HS2
 
14816-bit10Parallel transfer of setpoint-curve HS3
 
19716-bit10Parallel transfer of setpoint-curve HS4

M-Bus Heat Meter

The following values are available as Discrete Inputs.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
24916-bit10Supply temperature, Heat Meter HS1 (C)
25016-bit10Return temperature, Heat Meter HS1 (C)
25116-bit10Energy, Heat Meter HS1 (MWh)
25216-bit10Power, Heat Meter HS1 (kW)
25316-bit10Volume, Heat Meter HS1 (m3)
25416-bit10Flow, Heat Meter HS1 (l/min)
 
25516-bit10Supply temperature, Heat Meter HS2 (C)
25616-bit10Return temperature, Heat Meter HS2 (C)
25716-bit10Energy, Heat Meter HS2 (MWh)
25816-bit10Power, Heat Meter HS2 (kW)
25916-bit10Volume, Heat Meter HS2 (m3)
26016-bit10Flow, Heat Meter HS2 (l/min)
 
26116-bit10Supply temperature, Heat Meter HS3 (C)
26216-bit10Return temperature, Heat Meter HS3 (C)
26316-bit10Energy, Heat Meter HS3 (MWh)
26316-bit10Power, Heat Meter HS3 (kW)
26516-bit10Volume, Heat Meter HS3 (m3)
26616-bit10Flow, Heat Meter HS3 (l/min)
 
26716-bit10Supply temperature, Heat Meter HS4 (C)
26816-bit10Return temperature, Heat Meter HS4 (C)
26916-bit10Energy, Heat Meter HS4 (MWh)
27016-bit10Power, Heat Meter HS4 (kW)
27116-bit10Volume, Heat Meter HS4 (m3)
27216-bit10Flow, Heat Meter HS4 (l/min)

Watchdog / Failover

These controllers do not support watchdog/failover logic of any of the "Parallel transfer of setpoint-curve" options. To solve this, NODA recommends using the NODA Modbus Gateway Addon.

Installation

A NODA Modbus Gateway Addon is required for installation.

Installation steps can be found under Modbus Gateway > Installation.

Setup

Before performing this step. Please ensure that you have finished all necessary steps in Modbus Gateway > Installation.

To complete the following steps, administrative access to NODA EnergyView is required. If you do not have administrative access to NODA EnergyView then setup has to be carried out by NODA support personell.

For each heating system controlled, NODA requires the following;

  • Outdoor sensors (C)
  • Supply and return temperature (C)
  • Offset of supply temperature (K)
  • M-Bus Heat Meter values
    • Supply and return temperature (C)
    • Energy (MWh)
    • Power (kW)
    • Volume (m3)
    • Flow (l/h)
  • Calculated supply temperature (C)

M-Bus Heat Meter values may be omitted if these values are transferred to NODA's system in some other way than via the Regin controller.

Roles

  • The NODA Modbus Gateway Addon acts as a Modbus Master.
  • The Regin controller acts as a Modbus Slave.
  • The NODA Modbus Gateway acts as a secure transport for the transmission of MQTT messages, from and to the Modbus Gateway Addon.

The following mapping is a recommended example of a single heating system installation. However, extend the mapping accordingly if there is more than one heating system.

Discrete inputs

Modbus NumberValue typeMultiplicationDirectionSensor target
116-bit signed integer0.1GEToutdoortemp (C)
2616-bit signed integer0.1GETsupplytemp_sec (C)
2816-bit signed integer0.1GETreturntemp_sec (C)
3216-bit signed integer0.1GETsupplytemp_sec_controller_setvalue (C)
24916-bit signed integer0.1GETmeter_primsupplytemp (C)
25016-bit signed integer0.1GETmeter_primreturntemp (C)
25116-bit signed integer0.1GETmeter_heatenergy (MWh)
25216-bit signed integer0.1GETmeter_effect (kW)
25316-bit signed integer0.1GETmeter_volume (m3)
25416-bit signed integer0.00166...GETmeter_volumeflow (l/h)

Holding registers

Modbus NumberValue typeMultiplicationDirectionSensor target
5016-bit signed integer10SETsupplytemp_sec_offset (K)

Wiring

If you are connecting the NODA Modbus Gateway to the Regin controller using Ethernet, then you must communicate the IP number of the controller to NODA.

On the controller, navigate to Configuration > Communication > TCP/IP to find the current IP of the controller.

On the other hand, if you are connecting the NODA Modbus Gateway to the Regin controller using RS485. Then the following is required;

  • Modbus Number
  • Baudrate
  • Stop bits (1 or 2)
  • Parity (none, odd or even)

The prefered settings here are; 19200 baud, one stop bit and no parity.

Modbus Mapping for Regin Corrigo Ardo

Table of Content

Modbus

A Regin Corrigo Ardo supports real (R), integer (I), index (X) and logical (L) values.

Real signal have a scale factor 10, except for the time setting signals which have scale factor 100, and the air flow signals which have scale factor 1.

Integer, Index and Logic always have scale factor 1.

For a more general explaination of the Modbus protocol, see the educational material.

Limitations

  • A maximum of 47 registers can be read in one message.

Outdoor sensors

The following values are available as Discrete Inputs.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
116-bit10Outdoor temperature HS1

Supply and Return temperature

The following values are available as Discrete Inputs.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
216-bit10Supply temperature HS1
516-bit10Return temperature HS1
 
616-bit10Supply temperature HS2
916-bit10Return temperature HS2
 
1016-bit10Supply temperature HS3
1316-bit10Return temperature HS3

Calculated supply temperature

The following values are available as Discrete Inputs.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
316-bit10Outdoor compensated setpoint supply temperature HS1
 
716-bit10Outdoor compensated setpoint supply temperature HS2
 
1116-bit10Outdoor compensated setpoint supply temperature HS3

Offset of supply temperature

The following values are available as Holding Registers.

Verify:
Allowed range is -100 (65436) and +100 (100), i.e. -10 Celsius and +10 Celsius.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
53516-bit10Parallel transfer of setpoint-curve HS1
 
53616-bit10Parallel transfer of setpoint-curve HS2
 
53716-bit10Parallel transfer of setpoint-curve HS3

M-Bus District Heat Meter

The following values are available as Discrete Inputs.

Modbus NumberSizeScaleDescription
36716-bit10Supply temperature, Heat Meter HS1 (C)
36816-bit10Return temperature, Heat Meter HS1 (C)
36916-bit10Energy, Heat Meter HS1 (MWh)
37016-bit10Power, Heat Meter HS1 (kW)
37116-bit10Volume, Heat Meter HS1 (m3)
37216-bit10Flow, Heat Meter HS1 (l/min)

Watchdog / Failover

These controllers do not support watchdog/failover logic of any of the "Parallel transfer of setpoint-curve" options. To solve this, NODA recommends using the NODA Modbus Gateway Addon.

Installation

A NODA Modbus Gateway Addon is required for installation.

Installation steps can be found under Modbus Gateway > Installation.

Setup

Before performing this step. Please ensure that you have finished all necessary steps in Modbus Gateway > Installation.

To complete the following steps, administrative access to NODA EnergyView is required. If you do not have administrative access to NODA EnergyView then setup has to be carried out by NODA support personell.

For each heating system controlled, NODA requires the following;

  • Outdoor sensors (C)
  • Supply and return temperature (C)
  • Offset of supply temperature (K)
  • M-Bus Heat Meter values
    • Supply and return temperature (C)
    • Energy (MWh)
    • Power (kW)
    • Volume (m3)
    • Flow (l/h)
  • Calculated supply temperature (C)

M-Bus Heat Meter values may be omitted if these values are transferred to NODA's system in some other way than via the Regin controller.

Roles

  • The NODA Modbus Gateway Addon acts as a Modbus Master.
  • The Regin controller acts as a Modbus Slave.
  • The NODA Modbus Gateway acts as a secure transport for the transmission of MQTT messages, from and to the Modbus Gateway Addon.

The following mapping is a recommended example of a single heating system installation. However, extend the mapping accordingly if there is more than one heating system.

Discrete inputs

Modbus NumberValue typeMultiplicationDirectionSensor target
116-bit signed integer0.1GEToutdoortemp (C)
216-bit signed integer0.1GETsupplytemp_sec (C)
316-bit signed integer0.1GETsupplytemp_sec_controller_setvalue (C)
516-bit signed integer0.1GETreturntemp_sec (C)
36716-bit signed integer0.1GETmeter_primsupplytemp (C)
36816-bit signed integer0.1GETmeter_primreturntemp (C)
36916-bit signed integer0.1GETmeter_heatenergy (MWh)
37016-bit signed integer0.1GETmeter_effect (kW)
37116-bit signed integer0.1GETmeter_volume (m3)
37216-bit signed integer0.1 * 60GETmeter_volumeflow (l/h)

Holding registers

Modbus NumberValue typeMultiplicationDirectionSensor target
53516-bit signed integer10SETsupplytemp_sec_offset (K)

Wiring

If you are connecting the NODA Modbus Gateway to the Regin controller using Ethernet, then you must communicate the IP number of the controller to NODA.

On the controller, navigate to Configuration > Communication > TCP/IP to find the current IP of the controller.

On the other hand, if you are connecting the NODA Modbus Gateway to the Regin controller using RS485. Then the following is required;

  • Modbus Number
  • Baudrate
  • Stop bits (1 or 2)
  • Parity (none, odd or even)

The prefered settings here are; 19200 baud, one stop bit and no parity.

Saia Burgess Controls (SBC) controllers

https://www.saia-pcd.com/

More documentation coming soon. :)

Siemens regulators

More documentation coming soon. :)

Schneider Electric regulators

More documentation coming soon. :)

Honeywell / TREND controllers

More documentation coming soon. :)

Communication

The NODA Modbus Gateway communicates with the NODA MQTT network over a 4G mobile network.

Communication is secured using standard client-based certificates where only a holder of a valid certificate can connect to the network.

Each client is further locked down using ACL (access control lists), declaring which topics (communication channels) a specific client is allowed to subscribe and publish.

A certificate can easily be black-listed (by NODA) if, for any reason, the certificate is compromised.

All communication over this MQTT channel is encrypted.

Communication protocol

The NODA Modbus Gateway relies on software written by the manufacturer (Teltonika) of the Gateway hardware. Teltonika developed a simple protocol for transferring Modbus requests over MQTT. The protocol works by;

A controller publishes a message in the format below on a request topic. The software interprets the message and performs a Modbus request based on instructions from the message. The software then replies on the response topic.

Request message

0 <COOKIE> <IP_TYPE> <IP> <PORT> <TIMEOUT> <SLAVE_ID> <MODBUS_FUNCTION> <REGISTER_NUMBER> <REGISTER_COUNT/VALUE> <DATA>

Explanation:

  • 0: must be 0, which signifies a textual format (currently the only one implemented).

  • Cookie: a 64-bit unsigned integer in range [0..2^64]). A cookie is used to distinguish which response belongs to which request. Each request and the corresponding response contain a matching cookie: a 64-bit unsigned integer.

  • IP type: host IP address type. Possible values:

    • 0: IPv4 address;
    • 1: IPv6 address;
    • 2: hostname pointing to an IP address.
  • IP: IP address of a Modbus TCP slave. IPv6 must be presented in full form (e.g., 2001:0db8:0000:0000:0000:8a2e:0370:7334).

  • Port: port number of the Modbus TCP slave.

  • Timeout: timeout for Modbus TCP connection, in seconds. Range [1..999].

  • Slave ID: Modbus TCP slave ID. Range [1..255].

  • Modbus function:

    • 1: read coils
    • 2: read discrete inputs
    • 3: read holding registers
    • 4: read input registers
    • 5: force/write single coil
    • 6: preset/write a single holding register
    • 15: force/write multiple coils
    • 16: preset/write to multiple holding registers
  • Register number: number of the first register (in the range [1..65536]) from which the registers will be read/written.

  • Register count/value: this value depends on the Modbus function:

    • 1, 2, 3, 4: coil/register count (in range [1..125]). Must not exceed the boundary (first register number + register count <= 65537)
    • 5: coil value (in range [0..1])
    • 6: register value (in range [0..65535])
    • 15: register count (in range [1..123])
    • 16: register count (in range [1..123]). Must not exceed the boundary (first register number + register count <= 65537)
  • Data: this value only exists for Modbus functions 15 (coil) and 16 (register). A series of coil/register values separated with commas, without spaces (e.g., 0,1,1,0,0,1 or 1,2,3,654,21,789). There must be exactly as many values as specified in register count. Each coil value must be in the range of [0..1]. Each register value must be in the range of [0..65535].

Response message

A particular response message can take one of the following forms:

For functions 5, 6, 15 and 16

<COOKIE> OK

For function 1, 2, 3 and 4

<COOKIE> OK <VALUE> <VALUE> <VALUE>

Where are the values read.

For failures

<COOKIE> ERROR: <message>

Where is the error description.

Examples

Reading five coils

Request

0 16468394968118163995 0 10.0.0.126 5020 5 1 1 1 5

Response

16468394968118163995 OK 1 1 1 1 1

Reading three input registers

Request

0 9958479625634 0 10.0.0.126 5020 5 1 4 1 3

Response

9958479625634 OK 1234 5678 9101

Sending too few holding register values

Request

0 565842596387 0 10.0.0.126 5020 5 1 16 1 3 1234,5678

Response

565842596387 ERROR: INVALID REQUEST````

Packages

Installing external packages on a Teltonika RUT9XX is quite cumbersome.

When talking about embedded systems in general, maintainers often reject package systems in preference of upgrading the entire system (firmware). The reason can be to save space or to be able to ensure compatibility.

Nonetheless, as a user or an advanced reseller of an embedded solution, developing and adding new software to a system is often required since the wanted functionality is usually missing. This lack of functionality is due to the simple fact that the manufacturer usually works with requirements which differ from other organisations. Therefore, unless you buy hundreds of thousands of devices, they see no benefit in introducing more work and complexity in their processes.

OpenWRT, the Linux distro the RUT9XX series uses as its OS, is somewhere between an embedded system and a server system. Developed as a "router OS", its intended target is of no question. Still, it maintains an extensive package system which allows for the installation of most server-related software. Components one seldom thinks of as part of a router. Then again, it is common for systems to have multiple roles these days. Whether or not this is a good thing is not to be debated today.

Compiling a piece of software and building an OpenWRT-compatible package is an adventure (rabbit hole) in itself. As such, we will not discuss it here, as our goal lies elsewhere.

Package format

OpenWRT uses the opkg package format, which derives from the now defunct ipkg package format. Yet still, the extension remains as .ipk.

These files are compressed tar archives with a fixed structure similar to, but not compatible with, Debian packages.

Adding a new package source on OpenWRT

Opkg packages use one or several repositories (feeds) as the remote storage location. You can find the declaration of these repositories in the folder /etc/opkg. Here you will find a couple of .conf files. Each file (often) points to a particular origin. In the RUT9XXX firmware, the available files are;

  • customfeeds.conf
  • distfeeds.conf
  • teltonikafeeds.conf

The Teltonika-specific file points to a repository with Teltonika's packages for software such as MQTT, Modbus etc.

The Distfeeds file contains several repositories with OpenWRT packages. These files are not only for the RUT9XX but for all devices compatible with the same CPU architecture.

Last, there is the Customfeeds file. Here one can add references to other custom repositories. For example, to add the current NODA repository, add the following line to the file.

src/gz noda https://opkg.noda.se

Save it and run the following commands.

$ cd /tmp
$ wget https://opkg.noda.se/public.key
$ opkg-key add public.key $ opkg update

NOTE: If you get an error containing;

opkg_download: Failed to download https://downloads.openwrt.org/.../mips_24kc/vuci/Packages.gz

Then you can safely ignore this error. It is due to the removal of the vuci feed from OpenWRT mainline, something Teltonika still needs to patch in their firmware.

Installing NODA packages

The following packages are available in the NODA repository (feed).

  • simple-modbus-server; a plain Modbus TCP server (slave) to act as an intermediary between two or more Modbus clients (masters). It supports multiple simultaneous connections, something lacking from the Modbus server available in the RUT9XX firmware since it can only handle one connection at a time.

To install a package; run the following command;

$ opkg install package-name

Simple Modbus Server

By default, this software runs on the same port as the Modbus server in the firmware and since two different software can't listen on the same TCP port. Therefore, you must disable the internal Modbus server before installing and deploying this software.

$ opkg install simple-modbus-server

The default configuration should suffice for most cases. If you need to change anything, you can find the configuration in;

$ cat /etc/config/modbus_server

config modbus 'modbus'
	option enabled '1'
	option port '502'
	option address '0.0.0.0'
	option coil '0:0'
	option discrete '0:0'
	option holding '0:9999'
	option input '0:0'
	option connections '32'

To enable the service to run at startup, execute the command;

$ /etc/init.d/modbus_server enable

To manually start the service, execute the command;

$ /etc/init.d/modbus_server start

Firmware upgrade

There is one major caveat with all of this, and that is a firmware upgrade. In stark contrast to desktop systems, an embedded system doesn't perform an upgrade of newer packages. Instead, it replaces its entire OS environment with a new one on every upgrade.

Such an upgrade will completely wipe all modifications from the system and will, in essence, restore the device to factory default. To avoid losing configuration, OpenWRT uses a separate storage system, UCI, to store all configuration files. When performing a firmware upgrade, one can choose to retain or wipe this store.

Still, this only pertains to configuration files. Packages are not part of the UCI system. As a result, the system must download and install packages after each firmware upgrade—something it doesn't do independently.

Teltonika solves this in their firmware by keeping track of installed packages in a temporary file which survives the upgrade and is then automatically installed once the router is online. However, this only works for packages in Teltonika's feed, not those from mainline OpenWRT or our custom feed.

There exists an attempt at solving this dilemma in OpenWRT, which is called opkg-extras, but it's not a maintained solution and doesn't work as-is. Why this is not part of the mainline OpenWRT firmware is a good question.

Examples

A typical Modbus TCP installation

TCP Network

A typical Modbus RTU installation

RTU Network

Questions and answers

Why does it say 'Teltonica RUTXXX' on the NODA Modbus Gateway?

NODA relies on hardware from many different manufacturers. For the NODA Modbus Gateway, we have decided on equipment from a Lithuanian company called Teltonika.

Why doesn't the NODA Modbus Gateway connect to the internet?

Please ensure that the status LED in the lower right corner of the front faceplate is green. If the signal strength indicator next to the status LED is low, please mount the device in a location with a better mobile network signal. If the status LED is flashing yellow or red, please refer to the Teltonika manual found at www.teltonika.lt or contact NODA for support.

Will the NODA Modbus Gateway work with my slave?

As long as the slave has support for Modbus TCP and Holding Registers is where the data is stored, then it should work.

However, there are situations when it is unwise for the NODA Modbus Gateway to write to the Modbus TCP slave continuously. For example, when writes will cause wear on an EEPROM flash. In such situations, data can still be read, but data can not (continuously) be written to the slave.

Introduction

NOTICE: This solution reaches end of life (EOL) on the 31st of December 2022.

This handbook contains instructions on how to install and configure the Intelligent Energy Controller (IEC).

IEC operation

The IEC sits between an outdoor temperature sensor and a regulating device (i.e. a controller).

Its main functions are:

  • to provide an interface for an outdoor temperature sensor
  • to emulate an actual temperature sensor
  • to interface with 1-Wire temperature sensors
  • to interface with an energy meter
  • to communicate with the NODA cloud platform

As an outdoor temperature sensor interface, it supports a range of temperature sensors that can be connected. See section Input modes for details.

The outdoor temperature reading, i.e. the reference temperature, is sent to NODA's platform along with readings from 1-Wire temperature sensors and the energy meter.

NODA's system calculates the optimal change in temperature for the (heating/cooling) system, based on the outdoor temperature (reference), gathered data, system parameters and various operational targets. This calculated temperature is then transmitted back to the IEC.

As a temperature sensor emulator, the IEC then feeds a customised temperature value to the controller, i.e. the calculated temperature.

This change the controller's measured outdoor temperature, which in turn decreases or increases the heating/cooling of the building.

The data exchange between the IEC and NODA is once every 10 minutes.

\pagebreak

Mounted system overview

Mounted system overview

  1. Cooling/Heating system Controller.
  2. Outdoor temperature sensor.
  3. Energy meter.
  4. Intelligent Energy Controller (IEC).
  5. 1-Wire temperature sensors.
  6. Teltonica RUT 3G/4G router (optional if the infrastructure already exists and can be used).

End-of-life notification

Due to the EOL of several components required, NODA is forced to shelf this product as of the 31st of December 2022.

A direct replacement does not exist at this time. For an alternative solution, see Modbus Gateway

Introduction

NOTICE: This solution reaches end of life (EOL) on the 31st of December 2022.

This handbook contains instructions on how to install and configure the Intelligent Energy Controller (IEC).

IEC operation

The IEC sits between an outdoor temperature sensor and a regulating device (i.e. a controller).

Its main functions are:

  • to provide an interface for an outdoor temperature sensor
  • to emulate an actual temperature sensor
  • to interface with 1-Wire temperature sensors
  • to interface with an energy meter
  • to communicate with the NODA cloud platform

As an outdoor temperature sensor interface, it supports a range of temperature sensors that can be connected. See section Input modes for details.

The outdoor temperature reading, i.e. the reference temperature, is sent to NODA's platform along with readings from 1-Wire temperature sensors and the energy meter.

NODA's system calculates the optimal change in temperature for the (heating/cooling) system, based on the outdoor temperature (reference), gathered data, system parameters and various operational targets. This calculated temperature is then transmitted back to the IEC.

As a temperature sensor emulator, the IEC then feeds a customised temperature value to the controller, i.e. the calculated temperature.

This change the controller's measured outdoor temperature, which in turn decreases or increases the heating/cooling of the building.

The data exchange between the IEC and NODA is once every 10 minutes.

\pagebreak

Mounted system overview

Mounted system overview

  1. Cooling/Heating system Controller.
  2. Outdoor temperature sensor.
  3. Energy meter.
  4. Intelligent Energy Controller (IEC).
  5. 1-Wire temperature sensors.
  6. Teltonica RUT 3G/4G router (optional if the infrastructure already exists and can be used).

Components

I/O board

I/O board

#Left side#Right side
1.KOMM2 expansion port7.Debug port
2.Status LEDs8.Reset button
3.SNAP module port9.Docking port for CPU board
4.Failover relays10.Programming header
5.RS232 port11.High/Low/RTD/VDC headers
6.1-Wire port12.Shunt port (P14)
13.Barrel jack
14.Output to the Controller
15.Input from outdoor temperature sensor

Status LEDs on the I/O board

There are 6 separate LED:s to the left of the KOMM2 expansion port. They are marked (from right to left), D13, D14, D5, D6, D7 and D12.

#Description
D13Wired to expansion module on U7
D14Wired to expansion module on U7
D5Debug function from ARM CPU board
D6Debug function from ARM CPU board
D7Debug functuon from ARM CPU board
D12Heartbeat from the I/O board microcontroller. Off for 10 seconds, On for 10 seconds. In Off state when board is power on.

ARM CPU board

ARM CPU board

  1. Communication pins.
  2. Micro SD card.
  3. Power LED (green) and Status LED (red).
  4. Ethernet port.

When the Power LED lights up, the CPU board has power. During start-up, the Status LED will briefly (for a few seconds) light up.

If the Status LED is continuously lit for more than 30 seconds, then an unknown fault has occurred.

The ethernet ports leftmost LED (green) lights up only if the board has detected a 100MBit/s link. A limited 10Mbit/s link does not light the LED. The rightmost (orange) LED blinks when there is network traffic over the port.

KOMM2 add-on board (optional)

KOMM2 board

  1. 20-pin ribbon cable. Connects to P1 on the I/O board.
  2. GPRS modem connector (optional).
  3. M-Bus port.

PSU

Power adaptor, 100-240V AC 50/60Hz to 5V DC, 3A

  • Max cable length: 1.5m
  • Center Pin positive
  • Inner barrel diameter; 2.1mm
  • Outer barrel diameter; 5.5mm
  • Barrel length; 12mm

IEC PSU barrel polarity

Preparing for installation

It is highly advised to review this documentation before setting out to install the IEC on site. Some preparations are required for a technician to be able to perform the IEC installation and its configuration on site.

Compile a list of materials required for the installation. Including, but not limited to, the following:

  • IEC hardware
  • power supply
  • GSM module and antenna
  • 1-wire sensors
  • Opto eye cable
  • resistors (shunt)
  • cabling and other materials

If the configuration of the IEC hardware is going to be performed on-site, then a laptop is required with the following:

  • an up to date or LTS version of a major GNU/Linux distribution OS or
  • Windows 10 or 11 OS
  • a free USB port
  • NODA Installation Utility v16 or newer
  • USB drivers for the configuration cable TTL-232R-3V3
  • the TTL-232R-3V3 configuration cable

Other recommended equipment:

  • a multimeter
  • a screwdriver set
  • a permanent marker (blue)
  • a permanent marker (red)

Installation and wiring

Input modes

The IEC supports two different input modes; High resolution with a narrow scope and Low resolution with a broad scope.

ResolutionScopeResistance RangeP13
HighNarrow30 $\Omega$ $\leq$ R $\leq$ 7.5 k$\Omega$Attached
LowBroad300 $\Omega$ $\leq$ R $\leq$ 43 k$\Omega$Removed

Switching between these two modes is done with a jumper on the I/O board. To move this jumper you first need to detach the ARM CPU board from the I/O board.

Search for a jumper in the middle of the I/O board marked P13. You can find it north (11'o clock) of the S1 / RC connector (P12).

With the jumper attached on P13, the board operates at high resolution with a narrow scope.

By removing the jumper, the board switches to low resolution with a broad scope.

This step is necessary to manage RTD sensors with a resistance (R) of more than 7.5 kOhm.

Place the jumper on a single header pin for safekeeping.

Failover relays

As a safeguard, the IEC has two relays which bridge the S1 port directly to the RC port in case of a fault.

Whenever the power is lost, or there is a failure in communication between the CPU board and the I/O board (for >= 30min), the I/O board automatically switches to this failover state.

In this case, the IEC decouples from the controller and the outdoor temperature sensor is then directly connected to the controller.

This failover can also be activated remotely by NODA.

Shunt resistor

When using a sensor with a resistance ($Rsensor$) of more than 43 kOhm, it is required to use an appropriately sized resistor ($Rshunt$) on P14 to scale down the resistance reported to the IEC ($Riec$).

The sensor is wired to the IEC after the failover relays and in parallel with the shunt resistor. As such, the resistance reported to the IEC can be calculated using the equation for calculating resistors in parallel:

$${1 \over Riec } = { 1 \over Rsensor } + { 1 \over Rshunt } $$

Solving for $Rshunt$, the equation becomes:

$$ Rshunt = { Rsensor * Riec \over Rsensor - Riec } $$

Use the above equation to calculate the value of the shunt resistor where required.

See details in Appendix B for more information and an example.

Supported passive sensors (RTD)

As long as an RTD sensor is within the measurements range of the I/O board and the resolution is adequate, the IEC can support any RTD sensor. However, sensors not listed in this table require implementation effort by NODA.

Type/element$\Omega$ @ -40C$\Omega$ @ +40CResolutionShunt Required
PTC 5224572.301132.64HighNo
575@20675.89528.18HighNo
NI1000 DIN791.311230.11HighNo
NI1000 L&G830.901185.67HighNo
PT1000 ITS839.671158.45HighNo
PT1000 AMERICAN840.301157.83HighNo
PT1000 IEC842.741155.41HighNo
PT1000 DIN842.751155.39HighNo
NTC AF401152.792231.85HighNo
T1 PTC1840.072638.16HighNo
DRT 34539725.313521.87LowNo
NTC Regin15833.069166.94LowNo
NTC 1000@2523393.14574.49LowNo
NTC TA 1800@2535687.021049.20LowNo
NTC 21C 1800@2539071.871034.67LowNo
NTC EGU43213.451041.67LowNo*
NTC Generic45025.692081.92LowNo*
NTC 21C 5000@25167813.712662.88LowYes
TEU NTC10AN239810.855593.53LowYes
10K3A1335686.235323.88LowYes
TEU NTC10336515.835323.02LowYes

* Depends on the requirement to read low temperatures.

Supported active sensors (Volt)

Type/elementTyp. V. @ -50CTyp. V. @ +50C
5VDC05
10VDC010

Output modes

The IEC supports two different output modes;

  • Voltage (standard for passive and active sensors)
  • Transistor (only for passive sensors)

Voltage mode is the preferred mode and is used to simulate both passive and active sensors. If calibration towards the controller fails, you may need to switch to transistor mode.

Changing from a voltage to transistor mode

For changing the output mode, three jumpers need to move on the I/O board:

  • P9 (marked as 2 in the figure)
  • P10
  • P11 (marked as 1 in the figure)

Headers and jumpers

ModeP9P10, P11Sensor type
VoltageJumperJumperPassive and active
TransistorJumperJumperPassive

Connecting to the outdoor sensor and controller

Before any wiring takes place, it is essential to know if the outdoor sensor is a passive or an active sensor.

If it is a passive sensor (RTD), then there are no special polarity requirements. However, if it's an active sensor, then the polarity must be respected. I.e. it must be wired from plus to plus and from minus (GND) to minus.

Wiring diagram

Outdoor sensor wiring

RTD Sensors

When connecting a passive outdoor temperature sensor to the S1 port of the IEC, no particular attention to the polarity is necessary.

Wiring from the IEC RC port to the controller requires the polarity of the I/O board to match the polarity of the Analog Input (AI) port of the controller.

If this is not marked, then use a multimeter while the outdoor temperature sensor is still attached to the controller and identify the polarity. If wired incorrectly; the controller, the IEC or both might take damage.

PT1000 sensor wiring

0-10V Sensors

When connecting an active outdoor temperature sensor to the IEC, make sure that the polarity matches the screw terminal. If wired incorrectly the IEC might take damage.

Wiring from the IEC RC port to the controller requires the polarity of the I/O board to match the polarity of the Analog Input (AI) port of the controller.

If this is not marked, then use a multimeter while the outdoor temperature sensor is still attached to the controller and identify the polarity. If wired incorrectly; the controller, the IEC or both might take damage.

0-10V sensor wiring

0-10V Controller AO

This variant is a situation where the controller can supply an Analog Output (AO) with a 0-10V signal that corresponds to the outdoor temperature sensor measurement.

The outdoor temperature sensor connects directly to the controller, or via a bus and does not connect to the IEC.

In this case, the controller's AO port communicates the outdoor temperature as a 0-10V signal to the IEC's S1 port.

The IEC reads port S1, performs it's computations and writes a 0-10V signal (using the same temperature span as defined for the input sensor) on its RC port. This signal represents the new outdoor temperature.

Make sure to match the polarity on both sides. If wired incorrectly; the controller, the IEC or both might take damage.

0-10V Controller AO wiring

This scenario often requires a one-time re-programming of the controller.

1-Wire Sensors

1-Wire is a device communications bus system designed by Dallas Semiconductor Corp. that provides low-speed data, signalling, and power over a single conductor.

The IEC supports up to 8 devices on a bus.

Temperature probes

The IEC is compatible with any DS18S20 or DS18B20 sensor. The ones supplied are wired to the screw terminal on the I/O board as follows:

Model+(D)QGND
Thermokon VFG54BROWNGREENWHITE
Thermokon VFG54+3 (BROWN)2 (GREEN)1 (WHITE)

Wiring

It is possible the generalise any bus into three different topologies:

  • Linear topology: One main 1-Wire bus with insignificant (less than 3m) branches or stubs.
  • Stubbed topology: One main 1-Wire bus with significant (more than 3m) branches or stubs.
  • Star topology. The main 1-Wire bus splits into multiple branches.

It is highly recommended to keep to either a linear topology or a stubbed topology.

Example 1-Wire circuit diagram

Network (Bus) length

The radius of a network is the wire distance from the IEC to the most remote device. This length S measures in meters. The network weight is the total amount of connected wire in the network, and also measures in meters.

For example, a star network configuration with three branches of 10m, 20m, and 30m would have a radius of 30m (i.e., the distance from 1-Wire master to the furthest slave) and weight of 60m (i.e., the total length of wire in the network, 10m + 20m + 30m).

The total weight of the network should not exceed 100 meters to prevent communication issues.

Cable recommendation

It is highly recommended to use a UTP cat 5 cable as this type of cable is readily available and has been proven reliable.

RS232 optical probe (IEC 62056-21)

The optical probe comes with 2m of cable. If additional length is required, then use a low capacitance (UTP cat 5) cable for a maximum combined length of 50 meters.

Wiring

Model+TXRX-
OP-00 (old)REDGREENWHITEBLACK
OP-100 (old)WHITEYELLOWGREENBROWN
OP-333 (new)REDGREENWHITEBLACK

RS232 optical probe wiring

Supported protocols over the optical probe

  • M-Bus
  • KMP (Kamstrup 4XX, 6XX, 8XX)
  • IEC 61107

Wired M-Bus

Wired M-Bus support for a single slave comes via an add-on board. This board (KOMM2) does not come as standard.

The KOMM2 board is designed to work with a single slave device and does not work in a network with several slave devices.

The M-Bus uses two-wire cables which are going from the M-Bus Master / Repeater to each M-Bus device (bus structure). The M-Bus is polarity independent and does not require line termination resistors.

The max cable length depends on the type of cable used. Using a low capacitance cable a length of >100 meters is possible.

Connection to the KOMM2 board

Since the M-Bus is polarity independent, no special care is required when connecting the cable from the equipment to the KOMM2 board.

If the port on the M-Bus slave is occupied, an M-Bus splitter is required. The splitter is a device which allows multiple masters to communicate with the same network of M-Bus slaves.

Connecting to the RUT

  1. Placed the RUT in a spot where it can connect to the mobile network.

  2. Connect the power.

  3. Connect the IEC to the RUT by connecting an ethernet cable from the ethernet port of the IEC to either of the three ethernet ports marked LAN1, LAN2, LAN3 on the RUT router.

Note: The IEC will not connect to the internet unless the RUT has a working mobile connection.

Configuration

This chapter describes the procedure for configuration and calibration of the IEC.

Installation Utility download and installation

Windows 10 and 11

...

Linux (LTS release or recent up to date system)

...

Connect using the Installation Utility.

Testing the Energy Meter

  • Supported protocols

    • M-Bus
    • KMP
    • IEC61107
  • Explanation of difference in read-out between M-Bus and KMP/IEC61107 (registry location)

Maintenance

Replace faulty 1-Wire probe

...

Replace faulty Optical probe

...

Replace micro SD card

...

Replace ARM CPU board

...

Replace I/O board

...

Appendix A

Supported energy meters

ManufactorerModelNote
ABBF3
ABBF32
ActarisACE4000
ActarisCF 50
ActarisCF 51
ActarisCF 55
ActarisCF II echo
Apator-
BrunataOptuna H
CommonCRS-03
DanfossEEM-C
ICM-TF4
ItronACE 4000 GIU
ItronCF55
ItronCF Echo II
Kamstrup9 EVL
Kamstrup10 EVL
Kamstrup66C
KamstrupMultical
KamstrupMultical Compact
Kamstrup401
Kamstrup402
Kamstrup403
Kamstrup601
Kamstrup602
Kamstrup603
Kamstrup801
Kamstrup802
Landis & StaefaWSF4D
L&G2WR5
L&GUH 50
L&GUH T550
MetrimaF4
MetrimaF22
Pollux-
SchlumbergerCF 50
SensusPollutherm
SiemensUltraheat
SVM820
SVMME 142A
SVMF4
SVMF22
SVMF32
SVMS6
UNIFLO1000 TCE

Meters with partial support

ManufactorerModelNote
Enermet9 EVLMeter turns of the optical probe interface if no communication has occured for a certain time.
Enermet11 EVLMeter turns of the optical probe interface if no communication has occured for a certain time.

Appendix B

Shunt resistor example calculation

See below for an example calculation of a shunt resistor for a 10K3A1 thermistor sensor.

The 10K3A1 thermistor's maximum resistance rating is 335686.23 Ohm. The maximum rated input resistance for IEC's S1 port is 43 kOhm.

Working with the formula:

\[R_h = Shunt Resistance\]

\[R_{shunt} = Temperature Sensor Resistance\]

\[R_m = IEC Max Resistance Rating\]


\[R_{shunt} = 335686.23 \Omega\]

\[R_m = 43000 \Omega\]

\[R_h = ?\]


\[R_h = { R_{shunt} * R_m \over R_{shunt} - R_m }\]

\[R_h = { 335686.23 * 43000 \over 335686.23 - 43000 }\]

\[R_h = { 14434507890 \over 292686.23 }\]

\[R_h = { 49317.345 \Omega }\]

In this case, a 49 kOhm resistor would be perfect. However, since there are no standard resistors with 49 kOhm the closest we can get is 47 kOhm with a single resistor.

A 47 kOhm resistor in parallel with a resistance of 350 kOhm results in a resistance of about 41.k kOhm, well within the measurement range.

Resistor value (shunt) = 47 kOhm

See below for confirming that the resulting resistance is within the measurement range:

\[R_{shunt} = 335686.23 \Omega\]

\[R_m = ?\]

\[R_h = 47000 \Omega\]

From the formula earlier:

\[{1 \over R_m } = { 1 \over R_{shunt} } + { 1 \over R_{shunt} }\]

We have:

\[{1 \over R_m } = { 1 \over 335686.23 } + { 1 \over 47000 }\]

Which becomes:

\[{1 \over R_m } = 0.000002979 + 0.000021277\]

Result:

\[R_m = 41226.9 \Omega\]

So:

IEC maximum resistor value in S1 port = 41227 Ohm

This resistance is within the IEC S1 port resistor range, as mentioned earlier.

Modbus introduction

In 1979 Modicon (now Schneider Electric, published a new data communication protocol for use with its programmable logic controllers. This protocol, called Modbus, has since become a de facto standard for communication between industrial electronic devices in Europe.

The protocol is simple, openly available and royalty-free.

In a typical deployment, devices are wired together in a network consisting of several Servers/Slaves and one Client/Master, forming a supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system.

In 2004 Schneider Electric transferred the rights of the Modbus protocol to the newly formed Modbus Organization. Handing over the reins for the promotion and development of the Modbus protocol.

Known limitations

Modicon developed the Modbus protocol with a narrow scope of requirements. Back in the late 1970s, this was a good thing. However, today, these design decisions result in several limitations.

Table of Content

Security

The Modbus protocol has several limitations in terms of security that can make it more difficult to protect the data transmitted over a Modbus network and may leave the system vulnerable to attacks or unauthorized access. To address these security concerns, it may be necessary to implement additional security measures, such as encryption, authentication, and access control, at the application level or by using other protocols or technologies.

Lack of encryption

The Modbus protocol does not include any built-in encryption for protecting the data transmitted between devices. This means that the data transmitted over a Modbus network can be intercepted and read by anyone with access to the network.

Lack of authentication

The Modbus protocol does not include any authentication mechanisms for verifying the identity of devices on the network. This means that anyone with access to the network can potentially send requests or commands to a Modbus server, potentially resulting in unauthorized access or manipulation of the data on the server.

Lack of access control

The Modbus protocol does not include any access control mechanisms for regulating which devices can access which registers on a server. This means that any device with access to the network can potentially read or write to any register on the server, potentially resulting in unauthorized access or manipulation of the data.

Supported data types

Modbus was developed in the late 1970s as a protocol for communicating with PLC controllers, which were common at the time. As a result, the data types supported by the Modbus protocol are limited to those that could be understood by PLC controllers. The protocol does not have the ability to handle complex data structures or large binary objects, and only supports a few basic data types, such as 16-bit and 32-bit integers, 32-bit floating point numbers, and strings of up to 252 characters. This can be a limitation for devices that need to work with other types of data, such as 64-bit integers or more complex data structures.

No query support

There is no standard function for discovering the number, type, or size of the registers on a server. This means that a device that wants to access the registers on a server must know in advance the addresses and data types of the registers it wants to access.

The Modbus protocol does not include any functions for browsing or searching the contents of a server. This can be a limitation for devices that need to dynamically discover or access the registers on a server, as they must manually request the values of individual registers or groups of registers.

This lack of standard functions for discovering and accessing the contents of a Modbus server can make it more difficult for devices to interact with the server and may require more complex programming and configuration to access the desired registers. It can also make it more difficult to integrate Modbus devices with other systems or software that need to dynamically discover and access the contents of a server.

The request-reply model

Since the protocol is based on a client-server model, where the client initiates communication with the server by sending requests for data or commands, and the server responds to these requests. This means that it is not possible for the client and server to switch roles at runtime.

As a result, it is not possible to transmit data using an event mechanism in Modbus. Instead, a client must continuously read data from a server to get the current data or to detect alarm conditions. This can be inefficient, as it requires the client to constantly poll the server for data, even if there are no changes or events to report.

This limitation can make it more difficult to use Modbus in systems that need to quickly and efficiently detect and respond to events or changes in data, such as real-time control systems or systems with a high-frequency of data updates. It may also require more complex programming or configuration to implement event-based communication using Modbus.

Number of devices

It is important to note that both Modbus RTU and Modbus TCP are designed for use in small to medium-sized networks, and may not be suitable for large networks with a large number of devices. In such cases, it may be necessary to use other protocols or technologies to support the required number of devices.

Modbus RTU

The maximum number of devices that can be connected to a Modbus RTU network is limited by the capacity of the communication link, as well as the addressing range of the Modbus protocol. Modbus RTU uses a single-master, multiple-slave architecture, where a master device initiates communication with one or more slave devices. The Modbus RTU specification defines a range of device addresses from 1 to 247, which means that a maximum of 247 slave devices can be connected to a single Modbus RTU network. However, the actual number of devices that can be connected may be limited by the capacity of the communication link and the amount of data being transmitted.

Modbus TCP

The maximum number of devices that can be connected to a Modbus TCP network is limited by the capacity of the communication link and the IP addresses available in the network. Modbus TCP uses a client-server architecture, where multiple clients can communicate with one or more servers. The Modbus TCP specification does not define a specific limit on the number of devices that can be connected to a single network, but the actual number of devices that can be connected may be limited by the capacity of the communication link and the number of IP addresses available in the network.

Data types

Modbus supports four "objects";

  • Coils
  • Discrete inputs
  • Input registers
  • Holding registers

In the old Modicon specification, each object was bound to a particular address range. With the newer address standard, the full range is available to each object and the object type is determined by the specific commands to read and write.

Object typeAccessSizeModicon Address SpaceNew Address Space
CoilRead/Write1 bit00001 to 099990 to 65535
Discrete inputRead1 bit10001 to 199990 to 65535
Input registerRead16 bits30001 to 399990 to 65535
Holding registerRead/Write16 bits40001 to 499990 to 65535

Table of Content

Scaling of values

A scale (factor) is used to transform a decimal value into an integer value by multiplying it with that value. This is often required as simple computers are often bad at handling decimal values. As a result, we lose the decimal part when converting a decimal value to an integer value.

For example, if the value 3.1415 is to be managed in such a way, it can be scaled using 10, 100, 1000 or even 10000. Giving us the integer values; 31, 314, 3141 or 31415.

These integer values can then be transmitted to a more intelligent computer, where they are divided by the same factor to produce a decimal value once more.

Remember that the scale factor decides how many decimals are retained once converted back to a decimal value.

Endianness

Endianness in computing refers to the order in which bytes are stored in a multi-byte value, such as a 16-bit or 32-bit integer. There are two main types of endianness: big-endian and little-endian.

Big-endian refers to the order in which the most significant bytes are stored first, followed by the second most significant bytes, and so on. This is the order in which human beings typically read and write numbers.

Little-endian refers to the order in which the least significant bytes are stored first, followed by the second least significant bytes, and so on. This is the order in which many computer systems store multi-byte values, as it can be more efficient for certain types of operations.

Endianness is important in computing because it affects how multi-byte values are stored and interpreted by different devices and systems. Suppose different devices or systems use different endianness conventions. In that case, they may be unable to correctly interpret the values being transmitted between them, which can lead to errors or incorrect data being processed.

Modbus Endianness

When reading multiple registers from a Modbus server, the endianness of the registers can affect how the values stored in the registers are interpreted by the device reading the values.

For example, suppose a Modbus server stores 16-bit registers in Big-Endian format, and a device communicates with the server using Little-Endian format. When the device reads two 16-bit registers from the server, it will expect the least significant bytes to be stored in the first register and the second least significant bytes to be stored in the second register. However, the server is actually storing the most significant bytes in the first register and the second most significant bytes in the second register. As a result, the device will not be able to correctly interpret the values of the registers, resulting in an incorrect 32-bit value being read.

On the other hand, if the device is communicating with the server using the same endianness as the server, it will be able to correctly interpret the values of the registers and read the correct 32-bit value.

It is important for devices communicating with Modbus servers to correctly interpret the endianness of the registers being read or written, as this ensures that the correct values are transmitted between the devices and the server.

Big- and Little-Endian

Storage FormatRegister 1Register 2
Big-Endian0x12340x5678
Little-Endian0x56780x1234
Big-Endian0x98760x5432
Little-Endian0x54320x9876
Big-Endian0xFEDC0xBA98
Little-Endian0xBA980xFEDC

The Modbus memory can be thought of as a table of 16-bit registers. Each register is 16 bits long and can hold a 16-bit value. The registers are numbered from 0 to 65535. The first register is address 0; the second is address 1, and so on. The last register is address 65535.

In the table above, "Modbus Address" represents the address of the first register in the Modbus protocol. The "Storage Format" column indicates whether the registers are stored in Big-Endian or Little-Endian format. "Register 1" and "Register 2" represent two 16-bit registers that store 32-bit values.

For each 32-bit value, the most significant bytes are stored in the first register, and the second most significant bytes are stored in the second register in the Big-Endian format. In the Little-Endian format, the least significant bytes are stored in the first register, and the second least significant bytes are stored in the second register.

It is important to note that in Modbus, the bytes within a register are rarely swapped. Instead, the order in which the bytes are stored is used to determine the value of the registers as a whole. For example, if a 32-bit value is stored as 0x1234 0x5678 in Big-Endian order, the value of the registers would be 0x12345678. If the same value was stored as 0x5678 0x1234 in Little-Endian order, the value of the records would also be 0x12345678.

The choice of Big-Endian or Little-Endian storage for registers in Modbus is determined by the specific function being used and the device that is accessing the registers. However, both formats are commonly used in the Modbus protocol, and it is important for devices to correctly interpret the data in registers regardless of the storage format being used.

For example, suppose a Modbus client communicates with a Modbus server using the Big-Endian format. In that case, it will expect the most significant bytes of a 32-bit value to be stored in the first register and the second most significant bytes to be stored in the second register. On the other hand, suppose the server is using the Little-Endian format. In that case, the device will need to interpret the data in the registers differently, with the least significant bytes being stored in the first register and the second least significant bytes being stored in the second register.

It is important for devices to correctly interpret the data in registers regardless of the storage format being used, as this ensures that the correct values are read and written when using Modbus functions.

An example

Storage FormatRegister 1Register 232-bit ValueDecoded Hex Value
Big-Endian0x12340x56780x12345678305419896
Little-Endian0x56780x12340x12345678305419896
Big-Endian0x56780x12340x56781234873625686
Little-Endian0x12340x56780x56781234873625686

In the table above, the "Storage Format" column indicates whether the registers are stored in Big-Endian or Little-Endian format. "Register 1" and "Register 2" represent two 16-bit registers that are used to store the 32-bit value 0x12345678. The "32-bit Value" column shows the correct and incorrect interpretation of the 32-bit integer in hexadecimal format. The "Decoded Hex Value" column shows the decimal equivalent of the 32-bit value.

In the Big-Endian format, the most significant bytes (0x1234) are stored in the first register, and the second most significant bytes (0x5678) are stored in the second register. This is the correct way to interpret the value of the registers, resulting in the correct 32-bit value of 0x12345678.

In the Little-Endian format, the least significant bytes (0x5678) are stored in the first register, and the second least significant bytes (0x1234) are stored in the second register. This is also the correct way to interpret the value of the registers, resulting in the same correct 32-bit value of 0x12345678.

Latching and Non-latching

In the context of Modbus, manufacturers often use the terms latching and non-latching registers to describe the behaviour of registers in terms of how they retain their values after power is removed. However, it is important to note that the Modbus specification does not formally define these terms, and manufacturers may interpret them differently.

For example, some manufacturers may define latching registers as registers that retain their values even after power is removed. Other manufacturers, however, may define latching registers as registers that retain their values until someone explicitly overwrites or resets them, regardless of whether power is removed. Similarly, some manufacturers may define non-latching registers as registers that do not retain their values after power is removed, while others may define non-latching registers as registers that retain their values until someone explicitly overwrites or resets them, regardless of whether power is removed.

Manufacturers often use the terms latching and non-latching registers to describe the behaviour of registers in Modbus, but their specific definitions may vary. Therefore, it is important to carefully review the documentation provided by the manufacturer of a Modbus device to understand how these terms apply to the registers on that device.